MONTOUR COUNTY, PA BIOGRAPHIES

DANVILLE TOWNSHIP

From "The History of Columbia and Mountour Counties"
Battle, 1887


 
CHRISTIAN LAUBACH, merchant, Danville, was born in Sugarloaf Township, Columbia Co., Penn., February 22, 1816; a son of Christian (a farmer) and Mary (FRUTCHY) LAUBACH, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent, former of whom died in Columbia County in 1825. Our subject, the youngest of eleven children, was only nine years of age when his parents died, and he then went to live with his brother. He acquired his education at the old log schoolhouse of his township, and when seventeen years of age resolved to enter mercantile business. He obtained a position as clerk in a general store in Orangeville, Columbia Co., Penn., and in 1845 went into business in Danville, having removed thither in 1837, he having been engaged as clerk during the intervening period. During that time he had saved enough, together with $410 received from his father's estate, to enable him to open a mercantile establishment, and since then he has done a successful trade. He has increased his business from time to time and now also operates in separate stores, groceries and dry goods. By prudent management he has acquired a handsome fortune, and is now one of the oldest merchants in the place. He married, in 1842, Hannah, daughter of Jacob HEFLER and of German descent. Six children were born to their union: Martha B., wife of S. T. LEES; Emma A., wife of Lewis E. WOODS; Mary Ellen., widow of William Root; Sally; George, a salesman in the store, and Elizabeth. Mr. and Mrs. LAUBACH are members of the Methodist Church, of which he has been trustee and steward. He is treasurer of the Danville Mutual Insurance Company, a member of the board of trustees of the First National Bank, and also served three years as president of the First National Bank of Danville. In politics he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 162)

VICTOR A. LOTIER, editor and proprietor of the Daily and Weekly Record, Danville, was born in the city of New York, December 15, 1843, a son of Benjamin and Anna (RONK) LOTIER; former, who died at the age of sixty-nine years, was a native of this country and of French origin; latter a native of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., and of Dutch origin. Our subject received his early education in Philadelphia, where he remained until fourteen years old. He then came to Danville and worked in the rolling-mill until 1858 when he went to Rhode Island, and in 1862 enlisted in Company E, Third Regiment Rhode Island Cavalry. He was elected commissary sargent, subsequently promoted to orderly sergeant and was honorably discharged in 1865 at New Orleans. He then went west, where he remained about a year, and, returning to Danville, again worked in the rolling-mills until 1871. At that time he purchased an interest in the Danville Marble Works, was a stockholder in the Record Publishing Company, and subsequently purchased the paper (the Danville Record), which he has since published. This paper is a daily and weekly, and, like its editor, independent in politics. In 1869 Mr. LOTIER married Fannie HUGHES, who has borne him two children: Homer H. and Walter M. Mrs. LOTIER and her son, Walter M., are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She is a daughter of Peter HUGHES, who was at one time associate judge of Montour County, and who established the Danville Marble Works and conducted the marble and stone cutting business in this place for many years. He died in October, 1872. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 162)

CAPT. GEORGE LOVETT, Danville, was born in Ireland July 28, 1838, to William and Jane (JOHNSON) LOVETT, natives of Ireland where the father died. Their family consisted of eight children, and in 1852 the widow and four children immigrated to America, settling in Danville, our subject at that time being fourteen years old. He was educated in his native country and in America. He first worked in the rolling-mills at Danville, where he remained several years and served for a time as assistant superintendent. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, was made quartermaster sergeant, and took part in the engagements at South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 162)

COL. JAMES McCORMICK, retired, Danville, owner and controller of the 'bus line, was born in Montour County, Penn., June 26, 1818, a son of William A. and Margaret (SHAW) McCORMICK. His father was born in Ireland of Scotch parents; his mother was a native of Dauphin County, Penn., and of Scotch-Irish origin, and both were Presbyterians. The father came to Pennsylvania when a mere lad, entered a store as clerk and very naturally took up the business of merchandising. He moved to Columbia County at an early day and settled at Washingtonville. He and his wife were the parents of three sons and one daughter: William A., a physician now in Virginia; second and third were twins; our subject and David M., who died in Harrisburg, Penn., in 1873, a successful business man, being worth about $100,000. Our subject was reared in Montour County, Penn., receiving his education in the common schools of the county. In early life he clerked in various stores at Milton and Danville and after a few years drifted into business himself. He opened a general store at Washingtonville, where, in company with his brother, he did a successful business. Later they sold out and bought a store at Limestoneville, this county, and engaged in business for four years, when they again sold out and moved to Schuylkill County. There they followed mining and shipping anthracite coal, which business they also sold. Our subject then came to Danville and embarked in mercantile business, also running the state lines from Danville until the railroad was built. Since then he has conducted a 'bus line and has retired from all other business. He married in 1848, Agnes M., daughter of John FRANCISCUS, and of German and French origin. They have three children: William J., a manufacturer in Philadelphia; Maggie and Katie. Mrs. McCORMICK and daughter are members of the Presbyterian Church. Col. McCORMICK is a Democrat and has served two terms in the Legislature, appointed by the State. At the last senatorial conference (1886), for the Twenty-fourth District, he was the nominee from the county convention of this county. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 163)

T. F. McGINNES, general superintendent of the Montour Iron and Steel Works, Danville, was born in the city of Pottsville, Schuylkill Co., Penn., March 2, 1842, a son of E. W. and Eliza (PATTON) McGINNES, natives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch origin. In early life the father was engaged in manufacturing, but later in the coal trade in which he dealt largely. Our subject is the fourth of eight children, and grew to manhood in his native city, where he attended the graded schools and also clerked for his father. With the latter he then engaged in the same business, which they conducted successfully for a time, when our subject abandoned the business to accept a clerkship in one of the large manufacturing establishments of the place. There he remained ten years, when he was appointed superintendent of an iron manufactory in Schuylkill County, where he served until 1880. He then came to Danville and was employed in the Montour Iron and Steel Works as inspector of iron rails until 1882, when he was appointed superintendent. In 1885 he was made treasurer and in 1886 general superintendent of the works. This extensive company often employ as many as 2,700 men; so that the position of general superintendent is one of great responsibility. Mr. McGINNES was married in 1863, to Kate BERRYMAN, a lady of English origin, daughter of Dr. Cecil BERRYMAN, a prominent physician of Pottsville, Penn. She is the mother of one child, Jennie. Mr. and Mrs. McGINNES are members of the Episcopal Church, in which he takes a deep interest; has served as member of the vestry, and is now superintendent of the Mission Sunday-school in Danville. Politically he is a Republican, but has never held office. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 163)

THOMAS M. McMAHAN, photographer, Danville, was born in Montour County March 19, 1829, a son of James and Margaret (MURRY) McMAHAN, natives of Pennsylvania and of Scotch-Irish origin, the former a farmer. Thomas M. is the fourth in a family of five children, was reared on the farm in Liberty Township, educated in the common schools, and for several years followed agricultural pursuits. In 1853 he began to learn the art of photography, which has since occupied his attention. He worked at different places until 1865, when he settled in Danville, and since 1871 has been associated in the business with Mr. IRELAND, under the firm name of McMAHAN & IRELAND, and the success of the business is largely due to his exertions. In 1854 he married Caroline REED, of Scotch-Irish origin, and two children have blessed the union: Clarence and Lillian E. Mr. and Mrs. McMAHAN are members of the Presbyterian Church, and politically he is a Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 163)

WILLIAM H. MAGILL, retired physician and surgeon, of Danville, is the oldest physician in this part of the State. He was born in Montgomery County, Penn., March 24, 1795, son of William and Mary (DUNLAP) MAGILL. Their ancestors were among the early settlers of Pennsylvania. William MAGILL, Sr., father of our subject, was a tanner, and became a land owner and farmer; he was a Quaker, as was his wife, and his ancestors were Scotch-Irish Presbyterians. William and Mary MAGILL had six children; William H., our subject, was the third child. At the age of twelve years he entered the Doylestown Academy, in Bucks County, Penn., from there he went to Baltimore, Md., and read medicine with James SMITH, M. D., four years, and graduated from the Medical University of Baltimore, in 1817. He then attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia until the spring of 1818, when he began the practice of medicine in Danville, opening an office in the same house where he now resides. This house is of brick, erected by his mother in 1814, the family having moved here in the spring of that year. When Dr. MAGILL began the practice of medicine Danville was a small place, and houses in this vicinity were few and far between. Dr. MAGILL was a man of more than ordinary ability and skill, and possessed wonderful powers of endurance. He rode on horseback over a large scope of country, day and night, enduring hardships, and surmounting difficulties that the doctors of this day know nothing of. He married, May 1, 1828, Miss Mary, daughter of Gen. Daniel MONTGOMERY. This union has been blessed with eight children, viz.; Daniel, Elizabeth, William H., Hannah L., Robert D., Christiana M., Mary D. and James D., six of whom lived to be grown. Mrs. MAGILL died in 1882; she was an earnest Christian and a member of the Presbyterian Church; Dr. MAGILL is also a member of this church. He was the first burgess of Danville; in politics he was a Whig, but since the organization of the Republican party he has been one of its strong supporters. His name will be revered not only for his professional skill and honor, but for his deeds of charity and Christian example. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 164)

WILSON METTLER, retired farmer, Danville, was born in Rush Township, Northumberland Co., Penn., May 10, 1813, a son of Philip and Susanna (CARTER) METTLER. His parents were natives of New Jersey, of English and German origin respectively. The father was a farmer, and died in Northumberland County in 1856. His family consisted of nine children, of whom Wilson was the fifth. He was reared on the farm and educated at the schools of Rush Township. From his youth until 1868 he had been engaged in agricultural pursuits, but at the last named date retired, and has since resided in Danville, but still owns the farm, which is well improved. He married, in 1834, Miss Ann, daughter of John GEARHART, of New Jersey and of German origin. This union has been blessed with four children: Sarah E., wife of E. G. HUFFMAN; Susan, wife of Hugh VASTINE; Spencer C. (deceased) and Anna. Mr. and Mrs. METTLER are members of the Presbyterian Church, in which he has been elder. Politically he is a Democrat and has served in the capacity of school director of Rush Township. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 164)

JAMES N. MILLER, liveryman, Danville, was born in Columbia County, Penn., September 6, 1824, a son of Philip (a farmer) and Frances (READY) MILLER, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent, former of whom died in Columbia County, where he has resided many years and reared a family of seven children. Our subject was reared on the farm, attended the schools of his native place and early in life learned the tanner's trade, which he followed eight years. He then established himself in a general store at Jerseytown, was moderately successful and continued that business eleven years, having previously been engaged in the hotel business at Lewisburg and Jerseytown. In 1876 he was nominated and elected sheriff of Montour County on the Democratic ticket. He then moved to Danville where he has since resided, and, at the close of his term as sheriff, embarked in the livery business. Mr. MILLER is a Democrat and always takes an active interest in everything pertaining to that party in Montour County. He has been twice married; first to Susannah, daughter of John RISHEL. She was of German origin and died in 1852, the mother of one child, John, who is now married and a farmer. In 1855 our subject married Isabella, daughter of Samuel HILTERT, also of German descent, and a member of the Presbyterian Church. This union was blessed with one child, Sue F., who, since her mother's death, in 1873, has kept house for her father. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 164)

HENRY MOYER, dealer in clothing and gents' furnishing goods, was born in Germany, February 1, 1827, a son of Harmon and Barbara (LEVI) MOYER, natives of Germany. The father was a drover and dealt extensively in stock in his native country, where he spent his life. Henry is the ninth of twelve children, and was reared in Baden, where he received his education. In early life he learned the trade of a butcher, which he followed as a business until coming to America in 1852. He settled in Danville, Penn., and spent two years and a half in peddling and making himself familiar with the laws and customs of his adopted country. By close application he was able to start a general store in Danville in 1854, but in 1855 sold out and opened a butcher shop, and did a successful business for nine years. In 1864 he established his present business, at which he has been very successful. He married, in 1853, Sophia MYER, a native of Germany and who bore him three children: Fannie, Sarah and Harry, and died in 1860. Mr. MOYER then married Sarah GROSS, a native of Germany, who bore him seven children: Miles, Barbara, Rebecca, Bessie, Maurice, Lewis and Julius. Mr. and Mrs. MOYER are of the Jewish faith. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 164)

JACOB W. MOYER, of the firm of CRUIKSHANK, MOYER & Co., Danville, was born in Montour County, October 13, 1838, a son of Daniel and Susan (CORTNER) MOYER, natives of Northumberland (now Montour) County, and whose ancestors were among the early German settlers of Pennsylvania. He is the eldest in a family of eight children and grew to manhood in his native county, coming to Danville with his parents, in 1844. Here he attended the common schools and in early life learned the machinist trade, at which he worked for a time, subsequently embarking in his present business. The firm do an extensive trade in their foundry and machine shops, Mr. MOYER doing the drafting, also the buying and selling. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served nine months. In 1864 he enlisted in the One Hundred and Eighty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served on detached duty, being detailed to work on the calcium light, which was erected on the breastworks so as to throw the light on the enemy's camp, at least, one-half mile distant, and, being a skillful mechanic, Mr. MOYER was of great use in putting up the lights, and was thus employed until the war closed. He participated in several engagements, among them Antietam, Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg. He is a member of the council of Danville, and has been school director. In 1864 he married Clara, daughter of John DOTY, a native of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. MOYER are the parents of six children: Cora, Maggie, Virgie, Horace, Ella and Walter. The parents are members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. MOYER is a member of the I. O. O. F. and G. A. R., and in politics is Democratic. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 165)

HON. PHILIP C. NEWBAKER, physician and surgeon, Danville, is a great-grandson of Martin NEWBAKER, who emigrated from Germany before the Revolution and settled at Powell's Creek, on the Susquehanna River, eighteen miles above Harrisburg. Martin NEWBAKER served as a soldier in the war for independence, and some of his descendants still reside near the old homestead where Dr. NEWBAKER was born, and from where his father and family removed to Northumberland County. He is a son of John B. and Caroline Elizabeth (MAIZE) NEWBAKER, who were natives of Dauphin County, Penn., of mixed German and English descent, and are still living. The former, John B. NEWBAKER, is a physician, and is practicing his profession at Trevorton, Northumberland Co., Penn. His family consisted of five children. Philip C., our subject, is the eldest; he was born August 13, 1843, near Halifax, Dauphin Co., Penn. He received a good academic education at the West Branch High School and the literary department of the Missionary Institute, Selin's Grove, Penn. He taught school a few years, and on the breaking out of the late civil war, enlisted as a private in Company F, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served the full term of three months. He was at the battle of Hoke's Run or Falling Waters, in northern Virginia, one of the first engagements of the war. In August, 1862, he again enlisted in Company K, Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, at Philadelphia, for three years, which regiment was assigned to duty under Gen. Rosecrans in Tennessee, where from hardships and exposure in service, he contracted diseases which confined him to the hospital for several months. After partial recovery he was transferred to the Invalid or Veteran Reserve Corps and continued in it to the close of the war. He was honorably discharged from service July 5, 1865. From this it will be seen that he served in the army the greater part of the war. He then began the study of medicine with his father, and entered Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, where he graduated in the spring of 1869, and subsequently settled at Washingtonville, Montour County, where by skill in his profession, and integrity as a citizen, he gained a deserved popularity. On September 24, 1867, he married Miss Amelia A. KOONS, of Weissport, Carbon Co., Penn. Dr. NEWBAKER and wife have five children: Winifred M., Charles A., Bertha A., Edward J. and Francis W. In politics the Doctor is a Democrat, and in 1878 was nominated and subsequently elected to represent Montour County in the State Legislature, and was re-elected in 1880. He is a member of the State and county medical societies, and of the American Medical Association and is secretary of the Board of United States Examining Surgeons at Danville. He is also a member of Goodrich Post, No. 22, G. A. R., of Danville. In the spring of 1886 Dr. NEWBAKER purchased the property in which he now resides, at No. 24, Mahoning Street, Danville and has already acquired considerable practice. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 165)

JOHN C. PATTERSON, retired farmer, Danville, was born in Columbia County, Penn., in September, 1836, a son of John and Anna (MATHER) PATTERSON, natives of Columbia County, and whose ancestors were among the early Scotch-Irish settlers of that section. John C. is the youngest of a family of five children, four of whom grew to maturity. He was reared on the farm, educated at the district school, and followed farming until coming to Danville in 1866. September 3, 1864, he enlisted in the Two Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. January 1, 1866, he married Miss Mary E., daughter of Caleb APPLEMAN, and their union has been blessed with two children, Ella and Mary V. Mrs. PATTERSON and children are members of the Presbyterian Church. She is engaged in the millinery business, at which she is very successful. Mr. PATTERSON is a member of the Masonic fraternity. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 165)

EMANUEL PETERS, wholesale dealer in ice and oysters, Danville, was born in Union County, Penn., March 3, 1826, a son of Michael and Martha (MILLER) PETERS, natives of Pennsylvania, of German origin, the former a tailor by trade. Emanuel was their only child, and was educated at the subscription schools of Union County. He came to Danville when seventeen years old, and has since made it his home, and in 1854 embarked in his present business, at which he has been successful. In 1854 he married Elizabeth, daughter of Gideon MELLON, and of English origin. Their children are Arthur M., who is with his father; Anna Mary, wife of S. W. FISHER; Clara M.; F. G.; Lucy M.; Saddie M. and Elmer E. Nearly all the family are members of the Methodist Church. Mr. PETERS was a member of the One Hundred and Seventy-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry during the civil war, having enlisted in 1862. He is independent in politics; a member of the I. O. O. F. and the I. O. of R. M. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 166)

J. R. PHILIPS, United States gauger, Danville, was born in Columbia County, Penn., August 24, 1828, a son of George W. and Rhoda Ann (REESE) PHILIPS, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German and Welsh origin. The father was a chainmaker by trade, but made farming the occupation of his life, and now resides on a farm in Sullivan County, Penn., whither he removed in 1843. Our subject is the eldest in a family of eight sons and four daughters, all of whom grew to maturity, and was reared on the farm in Hemlock Township, Columbia County, receiving a common-school education. In early life he worked in the iron-ore mines, and in 1849 came to Danville and learned the puddler's trade in the iron works, serving a three years' apprenticeship, and when just completing his trade was appointed foreman in the Montour Iron & Rolling-mill Works, which position he occupied for twenty years. He served as justice of the peace for a like period and resigned in 1886. Since 1883 Mr. PHILIPS has been tax collector, and also United States gauger and market master of Danville. He is secretary of the school board and a member of the I. O. O. F., both of the encampment and subordinate lodge. In politics he is a Democrat. In 1850 he married Mary, daughter of David ALLEGAR, of German origin, and their children are George W., deceased; Amelia; Joseph W., a druggist, of Danville; Matilda, Margaret and Kate. Mrs. PHILIPS is a member of the Presbyterian Church of Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 166)

ISAAC RANCK was for more than half a century identified with the growth and development of Columbia and Montour Counties. He was much above the average of all that goes to make up a noble manhood, habits which bring no reproach and a character which shone brightly in the every day duties and vocations of life. His birth occurred May 19, 1811, in White Deer, Union Co., Penn. His parents, Isaac and Rebecca RANCK, were from Lancaster County, Penn., and were among the first settlers of Union County. He was the seventh in a family of thirteen children--ten sons and three daughters--all but one of whom arrived to the age of maturity. Seven survive the subject of this sketch in the full vigor of life. At the age of seventeen he was apprenticed to Messrs. CARR & Co., carriage builders of Milton, Penn., and, after serving four years, he moved, in the early spring of 1832, to the village of Danville, Columbia county, and established himself in business as a smith and carriage manufacturer, at the corner of Mill and Mahoning Streets, opposite the present opera house. He also engaged in the lumber and boating business but soon abandoned all but his shops. About 1834 he married Miss Catharine HELLER, and three children blessed their union: Norman Leslie, Ellis Hughes, Mary Elizabeth, all living. In 1842 he became widower, and in 1844 he married Elizabeth HELLER, who bore him four children: Anna Rebecca, David Hays, Catharine Frances and Henry Clay (the last two dying in infancy). David H. is the publisher of the Millstone and Corn Miller, Indianapolis, Ind., a representative monthly publication devoted to milling and mechanical interests. In 1872 death again entered his home and took away his wife. For eleven years he made his home with his son and daughter in Danville. On the 8th of March, 1883, Mr. RANCK passed away, dying in the faith of Christianity. All his life he adorned our common humanity with a character pure as light, with a reputation untarnished by worldly associations, by daily walk and conversation worthy of emulation, a legacy to his children more lasting than money. Mr. RANCK witnessed the growth of Danville from a small village of less than a thousand population to a city of 10,000 inhabitants. He was chief burgess of the city in 1860, and afterward served as councilman. He was also elected and served many years as justice of the peace. Columbia and Montour Counties can feel an honest pride in having had for more than fifty years a citizen who embodied so much that was good and noble. In personal appearance Mr. RANCK was commanding, above average height and of rotundity of build, weighing over 200 pounds. Honesty, justice and truth were woven into the woof of his being. Strictly temperate in all his habits, he lived to be three score and twelve years and passed to his reward. He was interred March 11, 1883, in Mount Vernon Cemetery, Northumberland County, Penn. His family, consisting of five children, all of whom except David H., were born in Danville and vicinity, have all maintained the high integrity and honor of the name. Norman was born August 2, 1835; Ellis H., born August 10, 1837; Mary E., born June 21, 1841; Anna R., born February 23, 1844, and David H., born February 5, 1847. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 166)

FREDERICK REAM, teacher in and superintendent of the public schools of Montour County, Danville, was born in Lancaster County, Penn., July 20, 1851, a son of John and Anna (WESTLEY) REAM, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin, and whose ancestors were among the early residents of Pennsylvania. The father by trade is a coach-maker; also for a time followed farming, and now resides in Washingtonville, Montour County. Frederick is the fifth in a family of five sons and three daughters, and was reared in Montour County, where his parents have resided since 1860. He received his early education in the public schools of Montour County, and was also a student at the Bloomsburg Normal School and at academies at other places. At the age of fifteen he commenced teaching, which he followed for sixteen years, pursuing through this period a well directed course of self-education. During 1870-73 he was engaged in mercantile business at Washingtonville, and since 1873 has followed teaching. He taught in Schuylkill County and at Freesburg Academy for two years, and in the Danville High School three years, and was elected county superintendent of public schools in 1884. Since then he has been engaged in that capacity. He is a Past Grand of the I. O. O. F., and trustee of the I. O. O. F. cemetery at Danville. Mr. REAM married in 1873, Mary C., daughter of William SEIDEL and of German origin. Their children are Bertha A., Vinnie Olive and Carrie S. Mr. and Mrs. REAM are members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. REAM is politically a Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 167)

S. Y. RICHARDS, photographer and owner and proprietor of the Danville art gallery, was born three and a half miles south of Danville, August 31, 1836; a son of John and Rebecca (CLARK) RICHARDS, who were among the early German settlers of Pennsylvania. His grandfather kept a hotel in Danville in the early pioneer days; his father followed farming all his life and died in Lycoming County on the farm where he had resided since our subject was four years old. He had been twice married, and by his first marriage had seven children, of whom our subject is the youngest; he grew up on the farm, also helped in the saw-mill and was an expert at running a circular saw. When he reached his majority he commenced to learn the carpenter's trade, and worked at it for ten years; later studied the art of photography, in 1866, in Danville; but being desirous of obtaining the best knowledge of that business he went to New York, where he remained under the instruction of Prof. Hugh O'NIEL, and obtained a thorough knowledge of the business. He then resided in Carbondale, Penn., for seven years, moving thence to Pittston, where he remained for seven years, and from 1884 to 1886 resided in Towanda. He then came to Danville and opened a large and well furnished art gallery, and is well worthy of the patronage he has received. June 7, 1861, he married Matilda A., daughter of David KINE, a native of Berks County, Penn. Mr. and Mrs. RICHARDS are the parents of the following named children: Ella, wife of Charles C. COLBURN; Hallie, deceased; Lizzie, wife of Walter SMITH, and Mamie. The parents are members of the Methodist Church. While a resident of Towanda, Mr. RICHARDS was a member of the board of stewards of the church. He is now a member of Saint Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church of Danville. Politically he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 167)

M. S. RIDGWAY, superintendent of the Montour Iron and Steel Works and Rolling Mills, Danville, was born at Milford Village, Pike Co., Penn., March 12, 1820, a son of Matthew and Elizabeth (LUDLOW) RIDGWAY. The former was born on Long Island, N. Y., and was of English origin; the latter was born in New Jersey, and was of French descent; they were the parents of seven children. The father was an influential man, and at the time of his death, in 1820, was high sheriff of Pike County, N. Y.; he was a brave and successful officer. A prisoner in his charge, who was convicted of murder in 1814, escaped from jail and fled to Canada. Mr. RIDGWAY followed, and with the assistance of some Indians succeeded in locating the murderer, but while negotiating with parties to get the criminal across the line to the United States, was himself arrested by the English authorities as a spy. He was a Quaker, and having an uncle in Canada, he succeeded in obtaining his liberty and returned home through the wilderness to Pike County, and his prisoner with him. Mr. RIDGWAY was a Mason, a man of more than ordinary intelligence and will power. He was a son of Jacob RIDGWAY, also a Quaker. M. S. RIDGWAY, our subject, is the youngest of the family, and was born the year of his father's death. He attended the common schools until the age of eleven years, when he chose a guardian. At sixteen he began to learn the trade of a blacksmith, and served a regular apprenticeship; then worked as a journeyman four years, and in 1844 came to Danville to superintend the blacksmithing in the erection of the Montour Iron and Steel Works. These works were completed in 1845, and shortly afterward Mr. RIDGWAY was appointed manager of the works, and has since remained in charge for a period of forty-three years. He has remained with the works through its adversity and prosperity, and although the business has changed hands six times, Mr. RIDGWAY has always been retained as the right man in the right place. He assisted in making the first "T" rail made in the United States. It was made by Murdock Levitt & Co., in Danville, Penn. This firm was succeeded by the Montour Iron Company. Mr. RIDGWAY married in 1840, in Norristown, N. J., Miss Rachel WHITEHEAD. Her parents were English, but of German descent. Mr. and Mrs. RIDGWAY have five children: Edwin O., married, and employed in the rolling-mills of Pueblo, Col.; Stephen, employed as shipping-clerk for a large manufactory in Ohio; Warren; Laura E. and Grant. In politics Mr. RIDGWAY is a Republican; he is a Knight Templar and has been a member of the Masonic order since 1846. Mrs. RIDGWAY is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 167)

DANIEL J. ROTE, retired cattle drover, Danville, was born in Northampton County, Penn., October 16, 1812, a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (LARCH) ROTE, natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a farmer all his life, and his ancestors were among the early German settlers of Pennsylvania. David J. is one of a family of twelve children, eight of whom grew to maturity, and was reared in Northampton County, where he was also educated in the early German schools. His English education has been acquired by his own efforts. He chose farming as his occupation, but prior to that had been engaged in the blacksmithing trade. Later he engaged in the cattle droving business, which has mainly occupied his attention, and at which he has been very successful. He has been twice married; by his first wife, Rebecca WEAVER, he had seven children. She died in 1845, and had been married in 1836. Twelve years after the death of his first wife he married Lucy A. CROSBY, who bore him one child, and died February 25, 1881. Mr. ROTE has retired from active business, and now resides in Danville. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, in which he has been a deacon, and takes an active interest in that denomination. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the I. O. O. F.; politically he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 168)

WELLINGTON ROTE, cattle dealer, Danville, was born in Northumberland County, Penn., a son of Daniel J. and Anna Rebecca (WEAVER) ROTE. He is the fourth child in order of birth, and was reared on the farm, attended the common schools, and also Dickinson Seminary, at Williamsport. He first clerked in the general store of Lewis ROTE, at Mausdale, where he remained two years. In 1870 he embarked in general mercantile business at Mausdale, and also dealt in coal; he then sold out and taught school eight or ten terms, in which vocation he was successful. Since 1876 he has been engaged in the stock business. Politically he is a Republican, a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the Masonic fraternity. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 168)

DAVID RUCKEL, agent for the P. R. R. & W. S. Express Company, Danville, was born in Columbia County, Pennsylvania, November 21, 1841, a son of Joseph and Margaret (WHETMORE) RUCKEL, natives of Columbia County, this State, and of German descent. The father followed agricultural pursuits all his life. David is the youngest in a family of four sons and three daughters, and was reared on the farm, receiving his education in the common schools, never attending more than six months in his life, and is therefore self-educated. He remained with his parents on the farm until he was twenty years of age, when he went to Berwick, Columbia County, and learned the shoemaker's trade. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, One Hundred and Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served nine months, the term for which he enlisted. He next enlisted in the One Hundred and Twelfth, Second Artillery, was promoted sergeant, and June 30, 1864, was taken prisoner in front of Petersburg. He was removed to Danville, Va., where he was kept a prisoner of war for eight months and nineteen days. He was then exchanged and, after the war, returned to the farm, where he remained until 1867, when he moved to Danville and worked in the rolling-mill until 1873. He was next employed with the raiload [sic] and express companies, and in 1882 was appointed to his present position. In 1867 he married Miss Lucinda NUSS, of German descent. Two children were born to them: Charles E., who is in the office with his father, and Ella L., deceased. Mrs. RUCKEL is a member of the German Reformed Church, and her son of the Episcopal. Mr. RUCKEL is a member of the Masonic fraternity, politically a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 168)

JAMES SCARLET, of the firm of SCARLET & ANGLE, attorneys, Danville, was born in Elizabeth, N. J., December 31, 1848, a son of George and Mary SCARLET. The former was of English origin, and for many years a sea captain; the latter was of Scotch-Irish descent. James is the eldest of a family of three sons and grew to manhood in Danville, attending the schools of that place, where he also learned the blacksmith's trade. He subsequently entered Princeton College and graduated in the regular classical course in 1874. He studied law in Danville in the office of Thomas GALBRITH, Esq., was admitted to practice in the courts of Montour County in 1877, and in 1875 was admitted to the supreme court, and also the United States courts. He was elected to the office of district attorney for Montour County in 1882, and after serving his term was nominated by the Republican party for the Legislature in 1885, but was defeated with James G. BLAINE. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 168)

THOMAS A. SCHOTT, coal merchant, Danville, was born in Rockland Township, Berks Co., Penn., October 7, 1836, a son of Anthony and Harriet (ROARBACK) SCHOTT, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin. In early life his father was a charcoal burner, later a furnace blower, which occupation he followed until his death in 1871. His family consisted of five children, four of whom grew to maturity. Thomas A. is the second child; he received his education in the common schools, and later learned the cigarmakers' trade, which he followed five years. Later he learned the painter and carpenter trades, the latter of which he followed eleven years. He then engaged in teaming, also sold sewing machines, and then traveled and sold reapers for three years. In 1879 he embarked in the coal business on a limited scale, which enterprise has proved a success. He now owns an acre of land on which he has a coal yard, and has built a railroad which runs into the yard, where the coal is dumped from the coal cars. He also owns his neat and substantial residence, and his financial success is due largely to his own exertions. Mr. SCHOTT was married, November 29, 1862, to Elizabeth HARTMAN, a native of Germany, and to this union one child was born, Joseph A. Mrs. SCHOTT died in 1869, and in 1872 our subject married Mollie HARTMAN, a sister of his first wife. Their children are George W., Mary E., Anthony W., Grace E., Harry A. and Thomas A. Mr. and Mrs. SCHOTT are members of the German Catholic Church. Politically he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 169)

S. S. SCHULTZ, M. D., a native of Berks County, Penn., was born July 5, 1831, youngest son and child of Jeremiah and Mary SHULTZ [sic], both of whom were natives of Berks County. The paternal ancestor who first came to this county was Christopher SCHULTZ, the great-grandfather of our subject, who landed in the New World, September 22, 1734, then sixteen years old and a fugitive from religious persecution in Silesia. Young as he was, he was a fine scholar and became subsequently an able theologian, leader and organizer of men. Certainly, in all history there cannot be found an instance more completely verifying the phrase "born to command." He was the organizer and leader of the religious body to which he belonged, and that came to this country. He made the collection for the hymn-book used by the fugitives in the desert and the wilds. The theological works of this divine and temporal leader are yet, in much of their entirety, incorporated in the church formulas of his denomination to-day. On the maternal side the first immigrant to come to this country was George SCHULTZ, the great-great-grandfather of our subject, who came to America in 1734, in the twenty-fourth year of his age. The parents of our subject were Jeremiah and Mary SCHULTZ. The father was born June 7, 1979, and died February 4, 1874. The mother was born September 5, 1798, and died February 2, 1873. Their children, all living, are Henry, born June 16, 1821; Edward, born June 20, 1824; John, born September 6, 1828, and our subject. Dr. SCHULTZ was reared and educated in his native county until he was fourteen years old, when he attended school at Washington Hall, Montgomery County. From there he went to school at the academy in Allentown, Penn., which has since become Muehlenburg College, where he remained one year; then a short time at Freeland Seminary, Montgomery County, and then entered Princeton College, New Jersey, where he graduated in 1852. After graduating he taught school for a short time, and then commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Daniel D. DETWILER, of Montgomery County. After a careful preparation he entered the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated in 1856. Immediately after leaving the university he opened an office for the practice of medicine in Allentown, where he met with flattering success. But soon an opportunity offered for him to pursue the natural bent of his mind, and he accepted a position in the State lunatic hospital at Harrisburg, as assistant physician. He remained here until 1861. He then made the tour of Europe, where he spent one year studying the hospitals and public institutions of Germany, England and France. In the meantime war was raging in his native land, and he hastened his return and entered the army as acting assistant surgeon, and as assistant surgeon and surgeon of Pennsylvania Volunteers, and assistant surgeon and surgeon of United States Volunteers; remained in service to the close of the war. He served with the Seventy-fifth and Twenty-third Pennsylvania Regiments, and as executive officer and surgeon in charge, successively, in general hospitals at Harrisburg, Penn., Covington, Ky., Madison, Ind., and Columbus, Ohio. Here he resigned as superintendent of hospitals at the close of the war in 1865. He then returned to Harrisburg, and was in active practice from 1865 to 1868 when he was appointed by the commissioners of the hospital to come to Danville and take control of the construction and the superintendency of the Danville Hospital, and from the commencement of the work on the building to the present time he has been its efficient and able superintendent, to the great advantage of the State in its vast expenditures here, and to the blessing of the poor unfortunates who have been dwellers in this benevolent home. The real professional career of Dr. SCHULTZ commenced with his connection with his present office, and the history of the institution and the history of the Doctor, in his car of the insane, are practically one and the same, and the reader is referred to an account of the Danville Asy H. B. D. SECHLER, retired painter, Danville, was born on River Street, Danville, January 26, 1808, a son of Rudolph and Susanna (DOUTY) SECHLER, natives of Pennsylvania. His parental and maternal ancestors were among the early German settlers of the State. His father was a blacksmith in early and middle life, later was register and recorder of Columbia County, serving several years. In 1821 he was appointed justice of the peace and served until 1845, when he retired, and died in 1857, at the age of eighty-five years. He reared a family of six children, all of whom became good citizens and four of whom still survive. Our subject is the eldest of the survivors, was reared in Danville and educated at the subscription schools. He learned the cabinet-maker's trade and followed it for many years, but since 1840 he has been engaged in house and ornamental sign painting. In 1830 he married Miss Jane JAMISON of Mifflin County, Penn., who died in 1831. In 1835, he was married to Sarah, daughter of John GEARHART, and six children blessed their union, two of whom are living: Harriet, wife of Jonathan WATERS, and Emma, wife of John YORGY. Mr. and Mrs. SECHLER are members of the Presbyterian Church, in which he has been an elder, and also teacher and superintendent of the Sabbath-school. He takes an interest in all that pertains to the good of the community. Politically he is a Republican, formerly a Whig, was appointed justice of the peace in 1845, and served five years. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 170)

ABRAHAM SECHLER, musician, Danville, was born in that place April 13, 1814, a son of Jacob and Barbara (REICE) SECHLER, the latter a native of Switzerland, born in 1790. The SECHLER family came to Pennsylvania about 1775, four brothers settling on the site of Danville, about the close of the Revolution. They were farmers and took up about 500 acres of land, then a wilderness, a part of which is now the Thomas BEAVER farm, near the State asylum at Danville. Jacob SECHLER was the first male child born in Danville in 1790. the family were usually farmers. Abraham is the eldest son in a family of nine children, and is a natural musician. He organized the first band in Danville and as soon as his brothers became old enough they joined the band, and for several years six of them played in it. Abraham received but a limited education in the subscription schools of Danville, but has been a student all his life, and can now read and write English, French and German with ease. His first occupation was farming, which engaged his attention until he was nineteen years of age. He then operated a stationary engine for over forty years, and by economy and judicious investments has made money. During the war he invested his money in Government bonds, and now has a fine property where he resides and devotes his time to music, which he fully enjoys. In 1835 he married Lavinia, daughter of Asa PANCOST, and of English descent. Of their five children three are now living: Mary Alice, wife of Henry SCHICK; Sarah Jane, wife of John KENVIN, and W. W., in Philadelphia. Mrs. SECHLER died in 1864, and in 1869 our subject married Harriet, daughter of John WURTMAN, and of English descent. Their only child is Martha, wife of Charles ROBSON. Mrs. SECHLER is a member of the Lutheran Church, and Mr. SECHLER of the Episcopal. He is a Democrat in politics, and has served as tax collector. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 170)

F. R. SECHLER, liveryman, Danville, was born in Mahoning Township, Montour County, March 22, 1826, a son of Jacob and Barbara Ann (REISE) SECHLER. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812, and his grandfather, John SECHLER, a soldier in the Revolution and one of the early settlers of Danville; both were farmers. F. R. is the seventh in a family of nine children, and was reared to agricultural pursuits, which he has followed most of his life, but now resides in Danville engaged in the livery business. He married, in 1850, Abigail, daughter of Herbert BEST, a prominent farmer of English origin, and one of the early settlers of Danville, where he died in 1831. Mr. and Mrs. SECHLER have two children now living: C. R. and Barbara Ann. Mr. SECHLER is a member of the K. of P., politically an Independent, with Democratic proclivities. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 170)

JACOB SHELHART, retired, ex-sheriff of Montour County, Penn., was born in that county, August 14, 1825, a son of Jacob and Christine (EVERETT) SHELHART, natives of Lehigh County, Penn., both of German origin. His paternal and maternal ancestors were among the early German settlers of the State. His father was an early settler of Danville, lived to be eighty years old, and spent over seventy years of his life in this part of Pennsylvania. He grew to manhood in Cooper Township, now, Montour County, and in early life made farming his business, but later devoted his time to the manufacture of wooden plows, which he carried on for a time, also manufacturing wagons and wheelbarrows, when the canal was being made through Danville. Jacob is the sixth of eleven children, and his schooling was limited to about two months in the rude schoolhouse. He followed farming as a business until 1865, with success, and though not a believer in luck, does believe in pluck. Politically he is a Democrat, and in 1865 was elected sheriff of three years; then spent some time traveling over the United States and Canada. He has been twice married; first to Maria, daughter of Joseph FOUST, and of English and German origin. Mr. SHELHART has two children now living: Mary, wife of J. ANDREW, and Hattie. Mr. SHELHART is a member of the Lutheran Church; has been a member of the school board and overseer of the poor. He is at present making valuable improvements in Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 170)

DAVID SHELHART, merchant tailor, Danville, was born in Franklin Township, Columbia Co., Penn., May 9, 1833, a son of Jacob and Christianna (EVERT) SHELHART, natives of Pennsylvania and of German origin. His father was a farmer. David is the youngest of eleven children, and was reared on the farm until he was seventeen years old, receiving his education in the schools of Columbia County. He first clerked in the store of Christian LAUBACH, of Danville, where he remained six years, from 1850 to 1856. He then embarked in his present business, merchant tailor and dealer in gents' furnishing goods, and employs the best skilled workmen and cutter. In 1857 he married Malinda A., a daughter of Richard DEMOTT. She is of German origin, and has borne her husband four children: Emma, wife of Warren McHENRY; Kate D., wife of Harry RHODES; Frank and Charles Richard. The family are all members of the Presbyterian Church, in which Mr. SHELHART has been treasurer and superintendent of the Sabbath-school for fourteen consecutive years. He is a prominent member of the I. O. O. F., and has been connected with the lodge twenty-one years, and has passed all the chairs. Politically he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 171)

JOHN W. SHERIFF, bookkeeper, Danville, was born in Erie County, Penn., September 12, 1822, a son of William and Margaret (COLT) SHERIFF, natives of Ireland, but who came to this county in childhood. Our subject is the youngest of six children; was reared in Waterford, Erie County, where he received his education at the common schools and at the academy. In 1842 he came to Danville where he has since remained. On first coming here he clerked in a general store for fourteen years, and later ran a stage line from Danville to Pottsville, Northumberland to Wilkesbarre, and Danville to Williamsport and Blossburg, taking in all the villages on the route, carrying passengers and the United States mail. He had a partner in the business, and for several years they ran a packet boat on the canal until 1857, when the railroad was built. In 1860 he embarked in mercantile business which he continued with success until 1873, when he sold out and has since been employed as bookkeeper in the coal office of R. H. WOOLLEY, sole agent for Conyngham & Co., of Danville. In 1849 Mr. SHERIFF married Miss Martha WATERS, of German origin, and five children were born to the union: Margaret, wife of A. G. MARR; William; Mary (deceased); Matilda, wife of H. J. RUPERT, and Anna. Mr. SHERIFF is a Democrat and has served as member of the town council of Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 171)

GIDEON M. SHOOP, lumberman, P. O. Danville, was born in Northumberland county, Penn., June 23, 1821, a son of George and Elizabeth (COCKLEY) SHOOT, natives respectively of Cumberland and Dauphin Counties, Penn. Our subject is the youngest of a family of seven children, and attended the common schools of his native county until he was thirteen years old. He then went to Franklin County and learned the art of manufacturing French buhr mill stones, at which he worked for two years. He then went to Cumberland County, where he carried on the same business. He continued to carry on his trade until he came to Danville, in 1841, as collecting agent for several stage lines, and also embarked in the lumber business, dealing in and manufacturing lumber quite extensively, and owning several saw-mills. In 1846 he rented the "Brady Hotel," repaired and improved it; added another story; changed the name to that of "Montour House," and conducted it for eighteen months. (The house is still the leading hotel in Danville.) Mr. SHOOP's main business, however, is the lumber trade. He purchases large tracts of land in the south and elsewhere, from which he cuts the timber and manufactures it into lumber. His residence, among the most beautiful and attractive in Montour County, was erected at a cost of about $24,000; he also owns four farms in Montour County, the half of one in Virginia, consisting of 367 acres, and half of one in Northumberland County of 180 acres. Mr. SHOOP married December 2, 1846, Amelia D., daughter of William GEARHART. She is of English and German origin and the mother of four children, all deceased except one, William G., who is now engaged with his father in the lumber business. Mr. SHOOP is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church; is president of the board of trustees, a steward and a teacher in the Sabbath-school. In 1880 he was elected a lay delegate to the Central Pennsylvania Conference, and elected by that body a lay delegate to the general conference, which met in Cincinnati, Ohio, in May, 1880. Politically he is a Republican; is at present a member of the board of trustees of the Danville Insane Asylum; one of the directors of the Nail & Manufacturing Company; a director of the Bridge Company, and a director in the Danville National Bank, having served in that capacity longer than any other director, with a single exception. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 171)

B. F. SHULTZ, M. D., Danville, was born in Columbia County, Penn., March 19, 1828, a son of Peter and Sarah (BOBBINS) SHULTZ, former of New Jersey, of German origin, and latter a native of Pennsylvania, of Scotch origin. They resided in Pennsylvania for many years, where they kept hotel, but in later life retired to the seclusion of farm life. They reared a family of nine children--eight sons and one daughter--and all maintained the honor of the family name. Our subject, the seventh in the family, obtained his early education in his native county, and subsequently attended the university at Philadelphia for a time. He afterward took up the study of medicine in Danville, in the office of Dr. STRAWBRIDGE (the latter one of the leading surgeons in this part of the State), and also studied with Dr. PANCOST, of Philadelphia. He then entered Jefferson Medical College at the latter city, where he graduated with the degree of M. D. Subsequently he commenced the practice of his profession at Danville, where he has since bee actively engaged, and has secured for himself a well acknowledged prominence in his profession. Dr. SHULTZ has been twice married; first, in 1857, to Elizabeth, daughter of John MOWRER, and of German origin; she died in 1861, the mother of two children: Clarence (deceased) and Dora. Dr. SHULTZ's second marriage took place in 1870, with Mary, daughter of John HECKARD, and also of German origin; she has borne her husband four children: William C., Florence, Debora and Arminta. Politically the Doctor is a Republican. After the battle of Gettysburg he went to that place and volunteered his services as medical attendant. Mrs. SHULTZ was a member of the Presbyterian Church. Her death occurred December 19, 1886, in the forty-seventh year of her age. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 171)

ROBERT S. SIMINGTON, M. D., of Danville, was born and reared on a backwoods farm in Lycoming County, Penn., when deer and wolves were numerous. He attended the usual log-cabin school common to a new country, to which he walked two miles. The school, however, had excellent teachers, and young SIMINGTON began the study of mathematics and Latin before entering the academy. He assisted his father in opening up farms, making brick and lumbering, rafting logs down the river to Marietta, Harrisburg and Columbia, his father being an active business man and owning large tracts of land. Our subject continued his education at the academy at Milton, at McEwensville Academy, and at Lewisburg University, then studied medicine with Dr. James DOUGAL at Milton, Penn., and graduated at the University of Pennsylvania in 1854. He at once began the practice of medicine in Danville. In the spring of 1861 he went into the army as surgeon of the Fourteenth P.V.I., and later was with the Ninety-third P.V.S.; he was principally with the Army of the Potomac; was wounded at Malvern Hill, and resigned in Aug., 1862, returned home and has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. In 1873 he was elected associate judge for five years; was re-elected in 1878 and in 1883, and is still serving; was at one time elected burgess of Danville. December 28, 1854, Dr. SIMINGTON was married to Miss Regina Jane, a daughter of Hugh and Rebecca (LEMON) McWILLIAMS, who were born near Mooresburg, Liberty Township, Montour County. Hugh McWILLIAMS was a large land owner and a prominent citizen; served as treasurer of Columbia (now Montour) County, and was also postmaster. He was the eldest son of Robert and Jane (CURRY) McWILLIAMS of the vicinity of Mooresburg, Penn. She was the first white child born (1773) in the forks of the Susquehanna. She and her husband had three sons and two daughters: Hugh, Robert, John, Mary and Jane. Robert McWILLIAMS, their father, was a son of Lieut. Hugh McWILLIAMS and Rebecca (DUNWOODY) McWILLIAMS, who were Scotch-Irish Presbyterians, and emigrated from County Armagh, Ireland, settling in Northumberland County, Penn., four miles below Danville. He was a lieutenant in the French and Indian war, and was killed by Indians in December, 1775. He and wife had one son, Robert, born in July, 1775, in Northumberland County; he married Jane CURRY, and they settled in Liberty Township. His father, Hugh McWILLIAMS, was a son of Robert and Jane (ORR) McWILLIAMS, natives of Scotland, who emigrated to the North of Ireland, then to Montour County. They had three sons and one daughter: Hugh, who married Rebecca DUNWOODY; John, died a bachelor; Robert, married Ellen JOHNSON, and JANE, married Robert CURRY, who was killed by the Indians June 9, 1780, near Danville. Robert was in the war of the Revolution, and was killed at Valley Forge, December 25, 1777. Dr. and Mrs. SIMINGTON are members of the Mahoning Presbyterian Church, and have had three daughters: Gertrude, deceased wife of Calvin K. LEINBACH; Miss Harriet Elizabeth, and Annie Jean. Dr. SIMINGTON is the eldest son of Benjamin and Ann (IRLAND) SIMINGTON; the former was born in Liberty Township, Montour Co., Penn., in 1805, a son of Robert SIMINGTON, a native of Scotland, who immigrated to America in 1776, immediately joined the "Jersey Blues" and served with them through the war of the Revolution. He married Elizabeth JACOBY, of Northampton County, and came at once to Montour County, took up land, and died here at the ripe old age of eighty-four years. His children are John, Peter, Robert, Benjamin, James, Mary, Elizabeth, Margaret and Sarah, all born near Mooresburg, Penn. Dr. SIMINGTON's mother was a daughter of John IRLAND, who was born near Milton in 1773; his father, David IRLAND, came from Scotland in 1772, settling near Milton. David IRLAND's children were Robert, David, John, William, Elizabeth and Anna. David IRLAND died in 1827, aged ninety years; his sons, Robert, David and John, settled on farms adjoining the old homestead, and died of old age. William removed to New ADOLF STEINBRENNER, insurance agent, Danville, was born in Germany, January 2, 1834, a son of Michael STEINBRENNER, who was a school-teacher in Germany, where he spent his life. Adolf is the fourth in a family of six children, and was reared in Germany, where he received his education, graduating from the university at Heidelberg, in 1856. He obtained a position as bookkeeper and followed that vocation until coming to America in 1866. Arriving in this country he settled at Wilkesbarre, Penn., where he was employed as a bookkeeper for two years and a half, and subsequently came to Danville, where he embarked in the insurance business, which he still follows, representing the following companies: Liverpool, London and Globe, Commercial Union of London, Phoenix of London and many others, and is well fitted for the business. Politically he is a Republican, was a notary public from 1882 to 1885, and is now clerk of the town council. He is a member of the Episcopal Church in which he is organist, and a member of the various Masonic fraternities, the I. O. O. F. and the K. of P. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 173)

REV. A. B. STILL, Danville, was born October 15, 1823, near Chester Springs, Chester Co., Penn., to Charles and Catharine (SHELDRICH) STILL, natives of Pennsylvania and of hardy German ancestry, and both lived to obtain over four-score years. Rev. A. B. is the eleventh of twelve children (all of whom grew to maturity), and was reared on the farm, the pursuits of which his father followed. At the age of sixteen he was converted and united with the Vincent Baptist Church, of which his parents, brothers and sisters were members. At the age of seventeen he began to learn the miller's trade, having spent the previous years working on the farm in summer and attending the public schools in the winter seasons. After spending six years at the milling business he became fully convinced that it was his duty to become a preacher, and in October, 1846, left home to prepare himself for his life work. He entered the academic department of the Madison University of New York State, and there completed his academic studies; thence, in the fall of 1848, he went to the university at Lewisburg, Penn., entered the collegiate department, and graduated in 1852 with the second honors of his class. Soon after he took charge of the Logan Valley Baptist Church, in Blair County, Penn., where he had an opportunity to study theology, having the use of the library of the Rev. A. K. BELL. August 15, 1854, he married Miss Hannah, daughter of John DEEN, Sr., of Danville, and shortly after accepted a call to the Huntingdon Baptist Church, and entered upon his labors in the autumn. There his duties were arduous, preaching three times on Sunday, and also through the week, and spent the greater part of the winter in laboring in protracted meetings in his own field, and assisting at meetings in neighboring churches. His labors were greatly blessed, and large numbers were converted and added to the church. He remained pastor for over four years, during which time he was instrumental in organizing the Spruce Creek Baptist Church. In the fall of 1858, at the earnest desire of the Centre Baptist Association, he entered upon the work of missionary, and spent over a year in earnest and self-denying labor with the feeble destitute churches and in destitute places. The calls for his labors were numerous and pressing, and were abundantly blessed in the salvation of many souls. He next accepted a call to the First Baptist Church at Danville, and entered upon his duties as pastor April 1, 1860. Here he remained for two years, amid the excitement of the civil war. He then became pastor of the Lawrenceville Baptist Church, in Chester County, in April, 1862, where he had a field of labor which taxed all his energies, and, at that time, though he never entered the army, took a deep interest in supporting the Government. Having spent two years there he accepted a call to the Pitt's Grove Baptist Church, Salem County, N. J., in the spring of 1864, where he reaped abundant harvests in the building up of the church and the salvation of sinners. In the spring of 1867 he returned to Danville that he might give some attention to his wife's estate, and spent the greater part of the following seven years in preaching for the destitute churches in the Northumberland association. During that time he was instrumental in reorganizing the Sunbury Baptist Church, and also of organizing the First Baptist Church of Shamokin Town. In the spring of 1874 he accepted a call, and became pastor of the Marlton Baptist Church, New Jersey, where he remained about four years, and in April, 1878, entered on his labors as pastor of the Bethlehem Baptist Church, Hunterdon County, N. J., where he continued for eight years. During that period he gave much time to Sunday-school and prohibition work. In the fall of 1885 he was chosen moderator of the Central New Jersey Baptist Association, at Baptist Town, and in the spring of 1886 closed his labors with the Bethlehem Church and returned to Danville. Here he now resides and intends to spend his time in missionary work in the country around. He had two sons. JAMES D. STRAWBRIDGE, A. M., M. D., ex-member of Congress, Danville, a native of Montour County, Penn., born on the homestead farm of his father in Liberty Township, April 7, 1824, is the son of James and Mary Dale STRAWBRIDGE, the former born in Chester County and the latter in Union County. James STRAWBRIDGE came with his parents when a child to Montour County just before the close of the Revolutionary War, and settled in what was then called Mahoning Township, Northumberland County, now Liberty Township, Montour County, where he married. A farmer and by trade a tanner, he owned and carried on for many years the first tannery between Harrisburg and the lakes. This tannery was built by his father, Col. Thomas STRAWBRIDGE, who was also born in Chester County, Penn., where he was reared. He was an ardent supporter of the struggle by the colonies for independence; was commissioned a captain by the committee of safety in May, 1776, and in September, 1776, was a member of the first constitutional convention; later became lieutenant-colonel, and subsequently colonel, and was detailed to procure and superintend the manufacture of arms during the latter years of the war. Shortly before its close he moved to Northumberland County. In 1784 and 1785 he was judge of the courts, and was also a member of the first Legislature of Pennsylvania. He was married in Philadelphia to Margaret MONTGOMERY, a sister of Gen. William MONTGOMERY, of Danville. Col. Thomas STRAWBRIDGE and wife were among the original members and aided in organizing the old Chillisquaque Presbyterian Church. He died about 1814; his widow survived him a number of years, and died at the ripe old age of ninety-nine years and ten months, having never suffered a day's sickness from the time of her marriage to that of her death.
Col. Thomas STRAWBRIDGE had four children who lived to mature age: Christianna, who married Gen. Daniel MONTGOMERY; Mary, married to Gen. GRIFFIN; Alexander, who never married, and James (father of the subject of our sketch), who married Mary DALE, and had seven children, five of whom lived to maturity: Margaret M., married to James McCREIGHT, of Union County; Ann D., married first to Samuel SHANNON, of Northumberland, and afterward to William C. LAWSON, of Milton, Penn.; Thomas, who married Mrs. Elizabeth DALE, nee Miss BOSSLER, and now resides at Lewisburg, Penn.; James D., the subject of this sketch, who married, in 1851, Emily F. (daughter of the late William AGNEW, of Philadelphia), and she dying in 1853, he married, in 1872, Ellen V., daughter of Stuben BUTLER, of Wilkesbarre, Penn., and granddaughter of Col. Zebulon BUTLER, of the Continental army, who commanded the Wyoming settlers and troops at the massacre of Wyoming; and Samuel D., colonel of the Second Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery during the war of the Rebellion, and who now resides in Philadelphia.
Dr. STRAWBRIDGE received his preparatory education at the Danville Academy; entered Princeton College in 1841, and graduated in 1844. He commenced the study of medicine in Danville, with Dr. William H. MAGILL; afterward studied with Dr. Wm. PEPPER, of Philadelphia, and entered the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in the fall of the same year, graduating in the spring of 1847, when he at once commenced the practice of medicine in Danville, continuing in the same until 1860. In 1861 he entered the army as brigade surgeon, being first assigned to duty with the division of Gen. Joseph J. Reynolds, at Cheat Mountain in western Virginia. After the resignation of Gen. Reynolds, he was for a short time at Wheeling with Gen. Rosecrans, and was there transferred by Gen. McClellan to the West. At St. Louis he was ordered by Gen. Halleck to join the army of the southwest as medical director on the staff of Gen. Curtis, and reached Cassville just after the battle of Pea Ridge. Here he concentrated all the sick and wounded, transporting them as rapidly as they became able to be moved to St. Louis. After completing the removal of over 2,500 sick and wounded a distance of over 300 miles, he reported to Gen. Halleck's adjutant-general in St. Louis, and was then ordered to join a portion of the army of the southwest then on the way to Corinth. Reaching the camp of the Army of the Mississippi at noon of the day on which the rebels evacuated Corinth, he reported first to Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, and was a few days later transferred to the staff of Gen. Rosecrans. In consequence of continued ill health, he tendered his resignation, which both Rosecrans and Halleck declined to approve; but to retain his services in the army an arrangement was made with Dr. Chas. McDougal, medical director on Gen. Halleck's staff, by which he was assigned to the organization of general hospitals at Jackson, Tenn. Under certain exceptional provisions, Dr. STRAWBRIDGE consented not to press his resignation, and August 1, 1862, entered upon his duties at Jackson, Tenn., under instructions to have nothing further to do with the district commander, Gen. John A. McClernand, than to report his orders and make requisitions on him for supplies, which arrangement soon after culminated in the removal of the latter from his command of the district. Notwithstanding the many difficulties in the way of the hospitals at Jackson, the Doctor took care of nearly all the sick and wounded from the battles of Hatche, Bolivar, Iuka and Corinth. When the army began its movement toward Vicksburg, Dr. STRAWBRIDGE was instructed to procure trains and remove the patients to Columbus as fast as the hospital boats could transport them north, and while on this duty he was directed to look after the construction of the hospital boat "Nashville," then being rebuilt at Columbus for a receiving hospital, and was afterward assigned to the completion of the "Nashville," with directions to push the work as rapidly as possible and take the vessel down to Vicksburg. On the 1st of March he reached Young's Point, and on the 3d patients were received on board. By the 6th he had received and taken care of 1,900 sick men. A large convalescent hospital was established at Milliken's Bend, to which a considerable portion of these men were transferred, and the "Nashville" moved up to that point. Here, the "Nashville," which had been designed only for a receiving hospital, became, against the protest of Dr. STRAWBRIDGE, a permanent general hospital and for three months contained an average of about 1,000 patients, most of them the most sick of the army. The assistant surgeon-general, Dr. R. C. Wood, on the hospital steamer, "City of Memphis," on his return from an inspection in the field, where he had gathered some 200 of all classes of patients, ordered 250 sick to be transferred from the "Nashville" to the "City of Memphis," and that none were to be sent who were likely to die on the passage. Dr. STRAWBRIDGE remonstrated against this, and urged the removal of the very sick. Eighteen deat "Respectfully disapproved, as Surgeon STRAWBRIDGE's services cannot be spared from this army.


"By order of U. S. Grant, major-general commanding."
As soon as this order could be returned from the war department, Dr. STRAWBRIDGE was relieved from charge of the "Nashville," and ordered to report in person to U. S. Grant. While making up his accounts for transfer of property, etc., to his successor, Dr. STRAWBRIDGE was prostrated with congestive chills, and for a time his life was despaired of, but he finally rallied, and, as soon as able to travel, reported to Dr. Mills at Gen. Grant's headquarters. Still being too feeble for duty, however, he was directed to return to the river till convalescent. On July 7, Dr. STRAWBRIDGE was sent for by Gen. Grant, and assigned to examination of soldiers in hospitals, etc., for the purpose of discharge assignment to the invalid corps under the following order and verbal instructions:
"Surgeon STRAWBRIDGE is hereby directed to visit Young's Point, Millikensbend and elsewhere and discharge all such soldiers as in his judgment he may see fit."
The Doctor's health having again thoroughly broken down, Dr. Ormsby, with whom he had his quarters in Vicksburg, seeing that if he remained longer in Vicksburg, he could not recover, went to Gen. Grant on August 14, and obtained an order directing him to go on board the hospital steamer "R. C. Wood," which left Vicksburg that night, and report by letter to the war department from his home. This was very much against his own wishes; he had been offered the medical directorship on the dividing up of the army at Vicksburg, of any part he might desire. In October, he was ordered before a military commission in Washington, which recommended a longer furlough. In November he was sent before a military board at Annapolis, who disapproved his request to be ordered to duty and recommended his being sent to hospital for treatment. He then asked to be mustered out of the service; this was also disapproved by the board, and light duty recommended. He was then assigned to duty in the provost-marshal-general department, and sent by Gen. Frey to Philadelphia, and afterward to Harrisburg, to superintend the examination of recruits. In May, 1864, finding his health nearly restored, he again asked for duty in the field, and on the 18th of May, was ordered to report for duty to Gen. B. F. Butler, at Bermuda Hundred. Immediately after his arrival he was directed to follow up the Eighteenth Army Corps, then on the way up York River, to join the army under Grant, near White House. On his arrival at that place the battle of Cold Harbor had just been fought, in which the Eighteenth Army Corps bore the principal part and lost nearly 5,000 men. The base hospital for the corps was being organized, and, finding his services likely to be of more value there than at the front, remained there on duty as an operating surgeon for five days, during which time he was continuously employed from daylight until dark, performing many of the most important operations. On June 8, he reported to Gen. Baldy Smith, and was temporarily assigned to the second division under Gen. Martindale. The Eighteenth Corps was at that time withdrawing from the trenches, and, in the night following, marched back to White House, and were from there transferred by boats to the Appomattox River. Immediately after their arrival, the Eighteenth Corps commenced its advance on Petersburg. Dr. STRAWBRIDGE was here transferred to the medical directorship of the corps, relieving Dr. Suckley, who was transferred too the medical inspectorship of the Army of the James. Here Dr. STRAWBRIDGE reorganized the medical department and ambulance corps, and brought them into a thorough state of efficiency.
October 27, 1864, while the Eighteenth Corps was making a movement on the extreme right of the line in front of Richmond, Dr. STRAWBRIDGE was captured by rebel scouts, while on the flanks of the corps looking for a road by which he expected to send back his ambulance trains. He was retained a prisoner in Libby until paroled January 20, 1865. Returning to report at Annapolis, at the termination of his parole furlough, he was subpoenaed by the United States District Court, and had to return to Philadelphia, where he was temporarily assigned to duty as president of a medical examining board. Dr. John Campbel, medical director of the department of Pennsylvania, made application to the war department to have his assignment made permanent, but this was refused on the ground that application had previously been made by Gen. John Gibbon to have Dr. STRAWBRIDGE assigned to his staff, as medical director of the Eighteenth Army Corps, and by Gen. E. O. C. Ord, as medical director of the Army of the James. Dr. STRAWBRIDGE remained on duty in Philadelphia, on the board until his services were no longer required in that capacity; was breveted for meritorious services, and, September 4, was mustered out of the service of the United States.
In the fall of 1867 our subject again commenced the practice of medicine in Danville. In 1872 he was elected to the XLIII Congress of the United States, and on the day following the election he was married to Ellen V. BUTLER. After one term of Congress, the Doctor resumed his practice (which is almost exclusively confined to surgery) in Danville. The Doctor is a member of the State Medical Society, member of the American Medical Association, American Academy of Medicine, and of the section on Military Surgery of the International Medical Congress. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 173)

DAVID F. STROH, carpenter and millwright, was born in Livingston County, N. Y., March 1, 1830, a son of Jonathan (a farmer) and Elizabeth (OBERDORF) STROH, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German origin, former of whom died in 1838. Our subject, the youngest of the family, was reared on the farm in Northumberland County, where he attended school. Later he began to learn the millwright's trade, a vocation he has followed in connection with carpenter work, which he has continued since 1847, meeting with success. He married, in 1850, Miss C. A. VORIS, sister of E. C. VORIS, and three children have blessed their union: Edwin, Charles and Rebecca. Mr. and Mrs. STROH are members of the Lutheran Church at Danville, of which he is a trustee. Politically he is a Republican, and has served as judge of election. He is Past Grand of the I. O. O. F. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 176)

J. SWEISFORT, D. D. S., Danville, was born in Berks County, Penn., December 19, 1839, a son of Jonas and Maria (WHITMAN) SWEISFORT, natives also of Pennsylvania and of German origin. The father was a hotel-keeper in early life, later a lumber dealer, was three times married, rearing four children. Our subject is the third child and grew to manhood in his native county where he received his education. Early in life he chose dentistry as his profession, but when the war broke out he enlisted in the Third Pennsylvania Volunteer Cavalry in Company C, and served as duty sergeant. He was a faithful soldier, and on his return home studied dentistry in the Pennsylvania Dental College at Philadelphia, where he graduated in 1866. The same year he came to Danville, where he has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession. He is a Democrat politically, a member of I. O. O. F., both of the subordinate lodge and the Encampment; is also a member of the G. A. R., and since 1879 has been a member of the National Guards. In that year he was elected first lieutenant of that body; in 1880 was elected captain; September 24, 1886, he was elected major and is still serving as such. In 1867 he married Hannah, daughter of John EVERETT, a native of Pennsylvania and of German origin. They have two children: Lucy E. and Gussie May. The Doctor and Mrs. SWEISFORT are members of the Reformed Church, in which he has served as elder and deacon, also superintendent of the Sunday-school for three years. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 176)

WILLIAM TWIST (deceased) was born at Stratford-on-Avon, Warwickshire, England, August 18, 1813, to Laurence (a farmer) and Elizabeth (REDELL) TWIST, natives also of England, former of whom died in England; their family consisted of seven children, six of whom grew to maturity. Our subject, the eldest son, was reared on a farm and attended the common schools of his native place. In 1845 he immigrated to America to engage in the rolling-mill business, at which he had worked in England, being a proficient workman. While still in his native country he was prevailed upon to come to Danville, Penn., and on his arrival at the latter place immediately commenced work, and helped to make the first "T" railroad iron in the United States, a rail that now connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. Danville sometimes claims the honor of making the first railroad iron in the United States; however, Mr. TWIST made the first "T" railroad iron in this country, and has been engaged in the rolling-mill business for over half a century. He was superintendent of the old "Rough and Ready" Iron Works for seven years; also superintendent for a like period of the works which subsequently merged into the North Branch Steel Works, in which he was a stockholder, but after the failure of Mr. Peter BALDY, our subject was not connected with the firm in any way, save as inspector of railroad iron from the railroad companies. Mr. TWIST married in 1849 Susan A. GUNTON (a native of England, and a member of the Episcopal Church), by whom he had four children, all of whom survive him. Mr. TWIST was a strict Republican politically, and has served as a member of the town council; was also a member of the I. O. O. F., and a man of unimpeachable character. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 176)

T. O. VAN ALEN is one of the leading business men and manufacturers of Danville. He was born in Chatham Centre, Columbia Co., N. Y., August 19, 1819. His paternal great-grandfather emigrated from Holland to New York. His son, Gilbert VAN ALEN, was born in Columbia County, N. Y., and followed farming; married Miss Annis MOORE, of Columbia County, and to them were born two children: Reuben and Catharine. Catharine married Mr. John J. VAN VOLKENBURG, a farmer and merchant of Columbia County, N. Y. Reuben married Miss Mary, a daughter of Timothy and Sallie OAKLEY, and pursued farming and merchandising at Chatham Centre. They had three sons and one daughter: Gilbert R., Timothy O., Sallie O. and Lewis O. The daughter died aged thirteen years. Our subject, T. O. VAN ALEN, was eight years old when his parents moved to Salisbury Mills, Orange Co., N. Y. He attended the common schools until ten years old, when his father employed a private teacher. At twelve years of age Mr. VAN ALEN entered the academy at Kinderhook, Columbia Co., N. Y., remaining there two years, during which time he resided with the family of Dr. Henry VAN DYKE. Subsequently he returned to Orange County and attended the school of Nathaniel Stark, at Goshen, one year. At fifteen he went to New York City and served an apprenticeship in a hardware store until 1839, when he returned home and engaged in the manufacture of paper and agricultural implements, and merchandising with his father, until 1844, when he came to Danville to represent the interests of Murdock, Leavitt & Co. in the Montour Iron Works, and act as the resident agent of the company. During this time he built what was known as the Company Store and in 1846 engaged in merchandising, associated with individual stockholders of the company under the firm name of T. O. VAN ALEN & Co. In 1866, in connection with Geo. M. LESLIE and A. H. VORIS, he built a nail factory in Northumberland, Northumberland County, and is, with his sons, still engaged in the manufacture of iron and nails. Mr. VAN ALEN has always taken an active interest in Danville, and ranks among her leading manufacturers. It is a fact worthy of mention that he has kept his mills running through all depressions. He gives steady employment to about 200 men. He was married in 1846 to Miss Ann Catharine, daughter of Cornelius GARRETSON, iron master. Mr. and Mrs. VAN ALEN are members of the Presbyterian Church, and he was president of the board of trustees for a number of years, and for many years a trustee of the Danville State Hospital for the insane, and director of First National Bank. They have had eight children, five living, viz.: Cornelius G., Gilbert R., A. Oakley, Edmond G. and George L., all active business men except George L., a Presbyterian clergyman. Mr. VAN ALEN's father came to Danville after retiring from business, and resided with his son. T. O. VAN ALEN, until his death, a man of more than ordinary ability and intelligence. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 177)

HARRY VINCENT, president of the Danville stove manufactory, was born in England, December 25, 1844, a son of Job and Lydia (ROBERTS) VINCENT, natives of England. The father was a mason by trade; immigrated with his family to America in 1852; landed in the city of New York, and soon after settled in Montour County, Penn. Our subject is the eldest of seven children, and received a limited education in the common schools of his district. At the age of ten years he commenced work in the rolling-mills, which he followed as his principal business until he was thirty-two years of age. He worked on contract for several years, and during that time also found opportunity to study law, and took a course at Columbia College, New York, where he graduated in 1878. He was admitted to the bar of New York, and the same year to that of Montour County, Penn. Subsequently he commenced the practice of his profession at Danville in 1879, and entered into partnership with James SCARLET, which continued for two years. Mr. VINCENT then conceived the idea of establishing the Danville stove manufactory, and on the organization of a stock company, was elected its president. This business has proved a success, for which it is largely indebted to the energy and determination of Mr. VINCENT. In 1863 he married Sarah, daughter of William TAYLOR. She is also a native of England, born near the birthplace of her husband; is three months his junior; came to America the same year as Mr. VINCENT, and both located at Danville the same year, where they met for the first time, and were afterward married. Eight children were born to their union, seven of whom now survive: Elizabeth, Thaddeus, Henry, Thomas, Victor, Robert and Walter. Mrs. VINCENT is a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. VINCENT has served as a member of the council of Danville. In 1862 he enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and participated in several battles, among which were Antietam, South Mountain, Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. He was never wounded or taken prisoner, but had many narrow escapes, five balls entering his clothing; at the battle of Antietam his coat sleeve was completely shot off, but his person was uninjured. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 177)

E. C. VORIS (not in business at present), Danville, was born in what is now Liberty Township, Montour (then Columbia) County, January 4, 1826, a son of James and Anna (GRAY) VORIS, the latter a native of Ireland and of Scotch-Irish origin. James VORIS, a native of Pennsylvania and of Holland descent, was a carpenter and contractor, and carried on business in Liberty Township, this county, until fifty years of age, when he moved to Danville and retired from active labor. Our subject is the eleventh in a family of fourteen children; was reared on the farm, and at the age of sixteen commenced to learn the carpenter's trade with Mr. Joseph DIEHL, serving a regular apprenticeship, and continued with Mr. DIEHL until engaging with the Montour Iron Company. Here he was employed in the Montour Iron Works for thirty-seven years, twelve years of which time he was superintendent of the machine ships. He superintended the erection of the machinery of the Danville Manufactory & Nail Works, of Danville, and is one of the stockholders of that company. He has been an active business man nearly all his life, but since 1884 has lead a retired life. He married in 1855 Julia, daughter of Benjamin TROXELL, of Northumberland County, Penn., a farmer and of German origin. Mr. and Mrs. VORIS are the parents of the following named children: Charles E., a salesman in New York City; William A., a machinist in the employ of the Danville nail-mills; Frank L., a clerk in a store at Danville, and James H., attending school. Mr. and Mrs. VORIS are members of the Presbyterian Church, of the board of trustees of which he is president. Mr. VORIS was chief burgess of Danville in 1861, has served several years as member of the school board of Danville, and is overseer of the poor of Mahoning Township. He is a Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 177)

W. H. N. WALKER, general merchant, Danville, was born in that place, October 17, 1854, a son of William C. and Christianna (HILEMAN) WALKER, the latter a native of Pennsylvania and of German origin. The father was born in Ireland, came to America when eighteen years old, and has since lived at Danville, where he now resides at the advanced age of seventy-six years. Our subject is the second child and oldest son, and grew to manhood in Danville, where he was also educated. For a time he followed farming, which did not prove congenial, and then he engaged in work in a brickyard for four years, and subsequently clerked for Mr. A. J. AMMERMAN in the same store which he (subject) at present occupies. There he remained four years, and in 1883 bought out the business and has since managed it. He employs two clerks, runs a delivery wagon, and does a thriving business. In 1876 he married Jennie, daughter of William S. TOLAND and the children born to the union are Eva I., Frank J., Arthur P. and Harry T. Mrs. WALKER is a member of the Lutheran Church at Danville. Politically Mr. WALKER is a Democrat; is a member of the school board, a member of the K. of L. and of the Masonic fraternity. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 178)

W. R. WELLIVER, merchant, Danville, was born February 3, 1834, in Jerseytown, Columbia Co., Penn., to Abraham and Martha (WINDER) WELLIVER, natives of Pennsylvania. His grandfather, a farmer, was an early settler of Columbia County, where his son (subject's father) was born, and where he followed shoemaking in early life, but later farming. Our subject, the eldest of nine children, was reared on the farm and attended the district school, and also the academy at Millville, Columbia County. He was a diligent student and early began to teach, which profession he followed in the winter, and farmed in the summer for eight years, mostly in the country, but also several terms in Washingtonville. In 1863 he came to Danville and commenced business as a dealer in books and stationary, and so continued until 1867. In that year he began his present business (general merchandising), in which he has a good patronage, and keeps a large supply of goods. Mr. WELLIVER has been twice married; first in 1858 to Miss Sue, daughter of Peter WAGNER, and of German origin. She died in 1873, the mother of the following children: Lloyd, married and a merchant in Exchange, Penn.; Hal C., also married, and a merchant in Mooresburg, Penn.; Stewart, a clerk in his father's store, and Charles, at school. In 1878 Mr. WELLIVER married Adelaide CONDON, a native of Philadelphia, Penn. Mr. and Mrs. WELLIVER are members of the Baptist Church. He is a Democrat, but votes the Independent ticket. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 178)

S. J. WELLIVER, of the firm of WELLIVER & COLE, wholesale and retail hardware dealers, Danville, Penn., and East Main Street, Nanticoke, Penn., was born in Montour County, February 3, 1841. His parents, Abraham and Martha (WINDER) WELLIVER, were natives of Pennsylvania, whose ancestors were among the early settlers of the State. His father, a shoemaker by trade, followed farming all his life, and reared a family of nine children, of whom S. J. is the sixth. Our subject attended the common schools and also Greenwood Seminary at Millville, Penn. His first occupation was teaching school, with his brother, established a book and stationery store, and two years later merged their business into a general store. They carried on a successful general mercantile trade for several years, when Mr. WELLIVER sold his interest to his brother, and subsequently took charge of the hardware store of Charles H. WATERS, until the latter's death. He then clerked in a hardware store one year when he embarked in business on his own account, and a year later formed a partnership with James McCORMICK, which continued for five years, when our subject bought out Mr. McCORMICK's interest. In 1883 the present firm of WELLIVER & COLE was established. Mr. WELLIVER married, in 1866, Elizabeth, daughter of Simeon BEST, and of English origin. Mrs. WELLIVER has borne her husband eight children, seven of whom survive: Warren W. has charge of the branch store at Nanticoke; Mary Martha Carrie, Bertha, Clarence, Lulu, Harry, Jessie J. (deceased), and Frances. Mrs. WELLIVER is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, Mr. WELLIVER of the Baptist. In 1865 he enlisted in the One Hundred and Fourth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., of Danville. In politics he is a Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, pg. 178)

GEORGE W. WEST, surveyor and civil engineer, Danville, was born in Delaware County, N. Y., September 30, 1818, a son of William and Eliza (ROGERS) WEST. His mother was a native of the same county, a daughter of Hobert ROGERS, who was for many years a sea captain. William WEST was born in Schoharie County, N. Y., of English descent, a blacksmith by trade, and was twice married, having two children by his first wife. George W. is a child of the first wife and was educated in the common schools and seminary of his native county; subsequently attended Wyoming Seminary, being one of the first students at that institution, and while there studied surveying. His first employment was school-teaching, at which he remained six years. In 1845 he came to Montour County (then Columbia), and when Columbia County was organized he was appointed county surveyor. Since then he has served in that capacity and has been largely engaged in looking up original lines. He has been employed as surveyor in fifteen or twenty counties of Pennsylvania, and has run a great many lines in the coal regions to settle disputes. He served twenty-four years as clerk of the county commissioners, since he has been surveyor of Montour County. In 1854 he married Catherine Ann, daughter of John KASE, of German origin. To Mr. and Mrs. WEST eight children have been born, six of whom are now living: Charles, a resident of Chicago, Ill.; Nellie E., wife of Oliver DEIHL; William K., attorney, Danville; Louise; George M., assistant city engineer at Chicago Ill., and Isaac DEWITT, a school-teacher. Mr. and Mrs. WEST are members of the Presbyterian Church. Politically he is a Democrat, and has been city engineer for Danville since 1851. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 179)

W. C. WILLIAMS, proprietor of the White Horse Hotel, Danville, was there born July 11, 1856, a son of William and Martha (PHILIPS) WILLIAMS, who were natives of England, and who settled in Danville in 1847. Mrs. WILLIAMS' father served in the battle of Trafalgar, under the command of Admiral Nelson, and lost a limb in that famous engagement; he and his wife were born the same year, lived to be ninety-nine years old, and died within a few months of each other. Our subject's father was a farmer in early life, but later kept a hotel in Danville, and at the time of his death, in 1882, was the oldest hotel-keeper in the place. He was attentive to business and succeeded in acquiring a goodly share of this world's goods. His widow and two children survive him. Of the latter W. C. is the younger and grew to manhood in Danville, where he was educated and very naturally drifted into the hotel business, and, since the death of his father, has conducted the "White Horse." In 1877 he married Clara, daughter of Joseph SHULTZ, who was born in Pennsylvania of German origin. Mr. and Mrs. WILLIAMS have one child, William J. Politically Mr. WILLIAMS is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 179)

LEWIS E. WOODS, dealer in boots and shoes, Danville, was born in Northumberland County, Penn., August 27, 1844, to J. M. and Mary (EVANS) WOODS, natives of Pennsylvania, the latter of Welsh origin. The father, who was of Irish origin, was a dealer in boots and shoes, which business appears to have been followed by the family for many generations back. He embarked in business in 1857, at Danville, where he died November 30, 1878. He and his wife had a family of five sons and five daughters, and five children still survive. Our subject was educated in the common schools, and at the age of thirteen entered his father' store as clerk, where he remained until attaining his majority. He then went west and engaged as clerk in a dry goods store, until he succeeded in saving about $200, when he returned to Danville and embarked in his present business, in which he has been very successful, being a first-class salesman. He has occupied the same store since 1869. February 23, 1869, he married Emma, daughter of Christian LAUBACH, one of the oldest and most prominent merchants of Danville. Their children are Nelson, Mattie, Howard and Clarence. Mr. and Mrs. WOODS are members of the Methodist Church, of which he is a trustee, and is also a member of the K. of P. In politics he is a Republican. Mr. WOODS regards the year 1869 as the eventful one of his life; in February of that year he was married; in March he embarked in his present business, and in December his first child was born. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 179)

S. AUGUSTUS YORKS, assistant cashier of the First National Bank, Danville, was born in this place February 10, 1853, a son of Samuel and Mary Ann (WEST) YORKS, natives of Pennsylvania and of English origin. The grandfather, also named Samuel, was an early settler in this part of Pennsylvania and an officer in the war of 1812. Our subject's father was a prominent man, first a Whig and later a Republican, and the leading spirit in establishing the First National Bank of Danville. When the bank was organized he was elected a director and also president, which position he occupied until his death in 1878. Our subject is the fourth of five children; was reared in Danville, where he was educated in the public schools and the academy, and since he was seventeen years of age has been employed in the First National Bank. He is now assistant cashier. In December, 1875, he married Cornelia Page HANCOCK, daughter of William HANCOCK and of English origin. She has borne her husband two children: Samuel and Mary. Mr. YORKS is a member of the Presbyterian Church and secretary of the Sabbath-school. He is a Republican, has served six years as a member of the town council of Danville and is treasurer of the R. A. in that place. Mrs. YORKS is a member of the Episcopal Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Danville, pg. 179)

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