COLUMBIA COUNTY, PA BIOGRAPHIES

CATAWISSA

From "The History of Columbia and Mountour Counties"
Battle, 1887


 
Stephen BALDY, merchant, Catawissa, was born in Tamaqua, Penn., January 20, 1860, a son of Peter R. and Sarah (HORN) BALDY, natives of this State and of German descent. His grandfather, Stephen, engaged in mercantile business in Catawissa in the year 1817, followed it for a number of years, but retired when he was getting old, and the remainder of his days was spent in serving the public. He was associate judge and justice of the peace a great many years, and filled several minor offices. He was a faithful member of the Lutheran Church; politically a Democrat. Our subject's father, Peter, was born in Catawissa, and has been an employe of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company for a number of years, and attended school until thirteen years of age, when he entered the store of W. P. JONES as a clerk and remained four years. Since 1877 he has been engaged in mercantile business, having bought out I. John & Sons, and during eighteen months of that time was associated with H. C. JOHN as partner. Mr. BALDY carries a general stock of groceries, dry goods, crockery, etc. He owns a house and lot where he resides. He was married October 20, 1880, to Hallie R., daughter of John and Caroline CHRISMAN, and three children have been born to them: Helen, Lucy and Sarah. Mrs. BALDY is a member of the Episcopal Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 396)

T. D. BERNINGER, painter, undertaker and dealer in furniture, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Columbia County, this State, January 21, 1842, a son of Aaron and Anna (YOST) BERNINGER, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His grandfather, who was born in Berks County, Penn., was a millwright and came to Columbia County, where he followed his trade until death. Our subject's father was also born in Berks County, and is a millwright, but has followed the manufacture and repair of furniture for a number of years, and is now seventy years of age. He is the father of four sons. Our subject was reared near Catawissa, and when eighteen years of age served an apprenticeship at the chair and cabinet-maker's trades, and went to work in the Philadelphia & Reading shops at painting and car building, in which employ he spent twenty years. In April, 1883, he bought out the stock of furniture of William HARTMAN, put in a new stock of furniture, and has since continued the business. The stock in valued at $3,000 and is insured at almost its value. Mr. BERNINGER married in January, 1866, Margaret BOWDOIN, who has born him seven children: Anna M., William, Martha, Aaron, Maude, Susan, and Tobias. Mr. and Mrs. BERNINGER and two elder daughters are members of the Lutheran Church. He is a member of the United American Mechanics' Organization. Mr. BERNINGER does house and sign painting and devotes his time almost entirely to his business, employing four steady hands. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 396)

William BERNINGER, miller, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Maine Township, Columbia County, October 6, 1843, a son of Aaron and Phoebe A. (YOST) BERNINGER, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His grandfather, Henry, was born in Berks County, and was a miller, which trade he followed the greater part of his life. He moved to this county about 1825 and here remained until his death. Our subject's father was born in Berks County, Penn.; and was ten years of age when his parents moved to this county. He is the father of four children; three of these reside in Catawissa and one in Mifflinville, Penn. Our subject was put to the miller's trade when about eighteen years old, and learned the same under Noah CRITES in the same mill which he now operates. He worked for him eighteen months and then went to Franklin Township and worked in the MENDENHALL mill for three years; thence to Roaringcreek, where he remained six years, and thence to Rupert, where he worked in the mill five years. In the spring of 1879 he bought his present mill from I. W. McKELVY, and has since operated it. The mill is in constant use except on Sunday. Mr. BERNINGER supplies the home trade and competes with some of the best mills in the State, both in price and quality. He has the combination process, three run of buhrs, one double roller-mill, one twenty-inch underrunner, regrinder, bolts, purifier, etc., Home & Ewell smutter, etc. The mill is run by water-power and is equipped with all the necessary machinery. Franklin, his brother, is an employe in the mill, and has been working here more or less since Mr. BERNINGER purchased it. Mr. BERNINGER married, November 14, 1867, Matilda, daughter of Michael and Margaret MENSCH, and they are the parents of seven children, four living: Minnie B., Franklin, Lloyd P. and Vaughn. Mr. and Mrs. BERNINGER are members of the Lutheran Church. He owns eighteen acres of land south of Catawissa on which he has his mill and residence. He also farms to some extent. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 397)

Matthew A. BIBBY, agent, D. L. & W. R. R., Catawissa, was born in Lakesville, Dorchester Co, Md., January 26, 1842, a son of Henry and Sarah (GRAHAM) BIBBY, and of Scotch-English descent. His father was born in Maryland and was a farmer, which occupation he followed near Lakesville, Md., until his death in 1860. Our subject was reared on a farm until he was fourteen years of age, when he entered D. W. WELLS' store in Havre de Grace, Md., and remained seven years. In 1862 he went to Baltimore where he clerked in the store of George H. EDGAR, until 1868, when he removed to Renovo, Penn., and entered the office of the Philadelphia & Erie Railroad as clerk. There he remained until the fall of 1871, when he came to Catawissa and here has since been employed by the D. L. & W. R. R., as station agent, express and freight agent, and operator of the road--and the positions he has filled with perfect satisfaction to the company by which he is employed. He married May 23, 1872, Julia, daughter of David W. and Elizabeth (BOON) CLARK, and three sons were born to their union: David B., Frank and Robert. Mrs. BIBBY is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 397)

Joseph BREISCH, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Catawissa Township, this county, August 15, 1822, and is a son of George and Rebecca (WALL) BREISCH. His parents were natives of this State and of German descent. His grandfather, Jacob BREISCH, was born in Germany and came to America at an early day. His grandfather, WALL, was sold on board of a vessel to pay his passage to America. Our subject's father was born in Montgomery County, this State, and came to Columbia County in 1802, locating where our subject now resides. He died on the place now owned by John T. SHUMAN, in 1870, and which he at that time owned. Joseph was reared on the farm and remained with is parents until 1852. In 1853 he married Harriet MILLER, by whom he has five children: Emma J. (married to Chas. W. NEWHAUSER) and John E. (twins), Rebecca, Harmon and Regina. In 1852 Mr. BREISCH bought the farm where his son John now lives, consisting of 153 acres, moved on it in 1854 and there resided until 1864, when he came to his present place of 250 acres. He and his wife are members of the Lutheran Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 397)

John E. BREISCH, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Catawissa Township, this county, November 3, 1854, a son of Joseph and Harriet (MILLER) BREISCH, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His great-grandfather came from Germany at an early day and settled in Columbia County, where he owned a farm and followed agricultural pursuits all his live. Subject's father was born in this county; has been a farmer all his life, and is yet living on his farm. John E. was reared on the farm and remained at home until twenty-one years of age, when he married and moved to where he now resides and owns 155 acres of good land with about 100 acres under cultivation. He has been building during the last few years and now has one of the finest farm residences in this part of the county. He married, November 22, 1875, Lydia FRAM, a native of Schuylkill County, Penn. They are the parents of two children: Cora E., and Raymond E. Mr. and Mrs. BREISCH are members of the Lutheran Church at Catawissa. He is a member of the Grand Lodge, F. & A. M. In 1885 Mr. BREISCH started a dairy business at which he has since been engaged. He has a good trade and keeps fifteen head of fine cows. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 397)

Christian E. CLEWELL, a merchant, Catawissa, was born in Catawissa, July 12, 1840, a son of Jacob and Eliza (BROBST) CLEWELL, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His grandfather, Jacob, lived near Catawissa, was a farmer and owned two farms; he resided here until his death in 1862. Our subject's father came to Catawissa when a young man, also followed agriculture and lived on a farm adjoining the old homestead. He died in 1877 at his home. Our subject was reared on a farm, and remained with his parents until the war broke out. August 8, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty-second Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and served nine months under Capt. BROBST. He was in the battles of Chancellorsville and Fredericksburg, and after the expiration of nine months returned home, and until 1883 followed agriculture, which he was obliged to abandon on account of ill health. At the last mentioned date he moved to Catawissa, bought property, and engaged in mercantile business, which he has since followed. He carries a general line of groceries, flour and feed. He married, July 30, 1863, Amelia MARTZ, by whom he has had six children, five of whom are living: Sarah C. (wife of Porter S. SOOK), John, Anna, Ella and George. Mr. and Mrs. CLEWELL are members of the German Reformed Church. Mr. CLEWELL has built up a good trade and is doing a thriving business. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 398)

Jacob H. CREASY, P. O. Catawissa, traveling salesman for the notion house of File, Derr, Haney & Co., of Philadelphia, was born in Mifflin Township, this county, October 7, 1838. He is a son of Levi and Catherine (HARTSELL) CREASY, natives of Columbia County, Penn., and of German descent. His grandfather, Adam CREASY, was born in this county in 1780, and his (Adam CREASY's) brother was a member of the Legislature in the early times. Our subject's father was reared in Mifflin Township, where he also followed farming. He was lieutenant of a military company during the war of 1812, owned about 200 acres of land, was a member of the Lutheran Church, and died September 15, 1876. Our subject was reared on a farm until about eighteen years of age when he worked at the carriage trade for about eighteen months. He was then employed as clerk with Swank & Grover, at Hobby, Luzerne County, for seven months. He then formed a partnership with N. P. JOHN, which continued until 1867, when the firm dissolved, and Mr. CREASY again conducted the business alone. In the spring of 1868 he sold out to I. John & Sons, and in 1869 moved to Mifflin where he engaged in mercantile business until the spring of 1872, when he again sold out. The same year he returned to Catawissa and bought a cigar and tobacco establishment at Berwick, which he conducted seven months, and again returned to Catawissa where he has since resided. In July, 1873, he was engaged by his present employers. He married January 23, 1866, Sarah E., daughter of Isaiah and Mary (BITLER) JOHN, and they are the parents of four children, two living: Milton B. and Harry B. Mr. and Mrs. CREASY are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church; he has been a member of the I. O. O. F. and American Mechanics and of the K. of P., but lately has dropped out. He owns a lot in Catawissa and 618 acres of good land. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 398)

William T. CREASY, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in this township, February 23, 1856, a son of Nathan and Susanna (KRICKBAUM) CREASY; the latter was a native of Catawissa Township and of German descent. The former's ancestors came from Germany and settled in New Jersey, whence they moved to this county about 100 years ago. Some settled about Mifflin Township, this county, where they farmed. Subject's grandfather William was one of the earlier settlers in Catawissa Valley, Schuylkill County. He was a farmer, which occupation he followed all his life, with the exception of the last few years, when he lived retired in Catawissa. He died in January, 1886, being in his seventy-ninth year. Our subject's father was born in Catawissa Valley, and was there reared. After his marriage he bought a farm where Henry L. now resides, and there remained until his death in 1881. He was a member of the Lutheran Church. His wife died in 1883. Our subject was reared on a farm and remained with his grandparents until twenty years of age. He graduated at Bloomsburg Normal School in 1875, began teaching when sixteen years old, and taught eleven terms. In 1876 he moved to where he now resides. He married, March 23, 1876, Sarah Jane WEAVER, by whom he has three children: Charles, Katie and Sadie. Mr. and Mrs. CREASY are members of the Lutheran Church. He is a member of the Grange and is at present school director. He was one of the originators of the White Plymouth chicken, which breed now adorns his poultry yards. Mr. CREASY has three brothers and two sisters living, and two sisters dead. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 398)

Henry L. CREASY, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Catawissa Township, September 12, 1861, a son of Nathan and Susanna (KRICKBAUM) CREASY, both of whom were born and reared on the farm where our subject now resides. They were of German descent, and were the parents of eight children, six now living: William T., Francis P., Elmira (wife of W. H. HESS), Henry L., Nathan and Dora. Our subject was born and reared on the old homestead where he now resides, and owns 135 acres of good land, all under cultivation. This farm originally contained 300 acres, but has been divided into two farms. Mr. CREASY was married in 1884, to Anna SWEPPENHISER, of Centre Township, this county, and one child has been born to them, Hiram W. Mr. and Mrs. CREASY are members of the old Lutheran Church. He is an intelligent and enterprising farmer; has just commenced in life for himself, but is gifted with that energy which is sure to succeed. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 398)

PETER B. ERVIN, harness-maker, Catawissa, was born August 21, 1864, in Catawissa, a son of John and Henrietta (BODINE) ERVIN, natives of this county, and of German and English descent. His great-grandfathers came from the old country and settled in this county, near Catawissa, and Jonas METZ, a brother to his great-grandmother, was the first farmer in the vicinity of Catawissa, and lived and died here. The great-grandfather lived to be ninety-four years of age, and was a soldier in the Revolution. Our subject's maternal grandfather was a cabinet-maker but during the latter part of his life followed farming. His paternal grandfather, Isaac ERVIN, is yet living at the age of eighty years; is stout and strong, and does a good deal of his farming. He owns a farm, a part of which lies in Locust Township and a part in Catawissa. He learned the mason's trade and worked at it in his younger days. He helped to build the furnace at Danville, and, while so engaged, he had three ribs broken and was otherwise injured. Our subject's father was born on the homestead in Locust Township, and learned the carpenter's trade. He served in the war of the Rebellion, and after marriage moved to Catawissa, where he since worked at his trade. He is now employed by the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, as car builder. Our subject was reared in Catawissa, attended school until seventeen years in the confectionery business. In October, 1885, he commenced to learn the harness-making trade, and has since been engaged in making and selling harness. He is a member of the Evangelical Lutheran Church; is also a member of the P. O. S. of A. In politics he is a Republican.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 399)

WILLIAM EYER, surveyor and draftsman of the Catawissa division of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, P. O. Catawissa, was born in that place in 1844, and is a son of William J. and Charlotte (HAVEMEYER) EYER, former a native of Pennsylvania, latter of the city of New York. His grandparents on both sides came from German at an early day, and located in New York City, where they engaged in the manufacture of sugar, in which the HAVEMEYER family are still engaged, and have one of the largest manufactories in New York. They have also a large sugar refinery in Philadelphia. His grandmother HAVEMEYER was about ninety-eight years of age when she died; his grandfather died at the age of eighty years. Our subject's father was born in Selin's Grove, Snyder Co., Penn., and was reared on a farm until about twenty-one years of age. He began educating himself when young, studied for the ministry, and was ordained a minister of the Lutheran denomination. He came to Catawissa, when he was engaged in the ministry until his death. He was a man of noble qualities and beloved by all who knew him. Our subject was brought up in Catawissa and attended school until twenty years of age, when he commenced work at surveying for the Catawissa Railroad, at Summit Station, and was employed there two years. He was then engaged as station agent at Catawissa for six years; then entered the office of W. G. YETTER, division engineer of Catawissa division, as surveyor and draftsman, which position he still holds. He was married, January 11, 1873, to Mary RITTER, a daughter of David and Eliza RITTER. Mr. and Mrs. EYER are the parents of two children, John R. and Susan H. Mrs. EYER is a member of the Lutheran Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 399)

LUTHER EYER, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born March 12, 1846, son of Rev. William J. EYER (whose sketch and portrait appear elsewhere), and was educated principally at Millersville, Lancaster Co., Penn. During the years 1868-69 he was engaged with HAVEMEYERS & ELDER, New York, in a sugar refinery, and in 1870 resumed farming in Montour Township, this county. In 1873 he was married to Jane, a daughter of David CLARK, son of Andrew CLARK, one of the pioneers of Columbia County. By this union Mr. EYER has been blessed with four children: William, David, Kate and George. After marriage he settled on his farm in Montour Township, where he remained until 1880, when he bought property in Catawissa where he now resides, but still attends to his farm, He took an active interest in helping to establish the present excellent school and building, of which institution he has served as school director. For ten years he has been a director of the Catawissa bank. In politics he is a Democrat.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 399)

WILLIAM L. EYERLY, attorney at law, Catawissa, was born in Bloomsburt, Penn., August 18, 1852, a son of Michael F. and Eliza T. (KLUGE) EYERLY, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His maternal great-grandfather came from Germany. His grandfather, Jacob EYERLY, was appointed, by Gov. Wolf, prothonotary of Columbia County, which office he filled for about thirty-five years. He died in Bloomsburg. Our subject's father was born near Danville, this county, but later moved to Bloomsburg, where he was employed with W. F. CLARK, attorney at law, as clerk, with whom he remained several years. He then formed a partnership with Col. John G. FREEZE, attorney at law, and was with him several years, but is now leading a retired life. William L. attended school at Bloomsburg until twenty years of age, when he graduated and entered Col. J. G. FREEZE's law office in 1872 as a student. After two years of hard study he was admitted to the bar in September, 1874, and the same month located at Catawissa, where he has since been in practice, and is admitted to the supreme court. Mr. EYERLY was married, November 15, 1877, to Maggie M., daughter of John and Nancy REIFSNYDER, and they are the parents of one child, Paul R., born May 15, 1879. Mr. and Mrs. EYERLY are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. EYERLY owns a house and lot on North Third Street. He is a member of the College society, and is one of the prominent men of his profession, to which he is well adapted. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 399)

BENJAMIN P. FORTNER, of the town of Catawissa, was born in Locust Township, Columbia Co., Penn., October 31, 1811, a son of John and Sarah B. FORTNER. Natives of Pennsylvania, the FORTNER family are of Scotch descent, being the descendants of Lord Archibald DOUGLAS, of Bothwell Castle, Scotland, whose only daughter, Isabella, having a desire to see this continent, prevailed upon her father to consent to her coming to America, in company with a lady friend, which they did, and while on the passage the vessel in which they were was seized by a piratical crew of Algiers and robbed of all their effects, and they were landed in New York destitute of friends or the wherewith to support themselves. It happened that a farmer from New Jersey met them, of whom they inquired what they should do, and he replied he would take them home with him, which he did. Isabella DOUGLAS resided with his family and married a man by the name of FORTNER, and resided in New Jersey until their death. They had twelve children, one of whom, Jonas, went to Canada during the Revolutionary war with England, as he was prejudiced against the war. The grandfather of Benjamin P. FORTNER was born in New Jersey, and at the breaking out of the Revolutionary war he enlisted in the army and served nine campaigns in the army under Gen. Washington; was in the battle of Brandywine; was in camp in Valley Forge all winter, and marched with his regiment on foot from Philadelphia to Yorktown, and was there at the surrender of the British army. He moved to Columbia County near Mifflinville, Penn., and he had three sons and four daughters: George, Andrew, John, Anna, Naomi, Frances and Mercy. He died near Mifflinville, aged sixty-five years. His occupation was a farmer. our subject's father, John, was born in Sussex County, N. J., and when about fifteen years of age moved with his father to Columbia County, Penn., and after marriage purchased a farm south of Catawissa, where he lived and died in his fifty-ninth year. He was the father of three children, two sons and one daughter, viz.: Benjamin P., Jonathan and Martha B., who died in 1837. Benjamin P. remained with his father until he was eighteen years old, when he engaged with Samuel D. BROBST, of Catawissa, as a salesman, with whom he remained until he was twenty-one years, when he was elected constable, and served in that office two years. On March 5, 1835, he married Mary DAVIS, daughter of John and Sarah DAVIS, near Catawissa. In 1836 he and his father-in-law purchased a hotel at that place, which they lived in and kept as a hotel until 1838, at which time they sold the hotel. He then bought and ran two boats on the Schuylkill Canal, hauling coal from Pottsville to Philadelphia. In consequence of the completion of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad boating became poor, and he sold out and bid for and was allotted work grading on the Tioga & Corning Railroad. After finishing, he, in 1840, got work on the Wisconsin Canal, and worked there until the work was abandoned, after which he bought a farm near Catawissa, which he resided on with his family until 1860 (which he yet owns), when he moved to Catawissa, having considerable property there, where he now lives a retired life. He was, while living on his farm, elected justice of the peace, and in 1849 he was elected a member of the Legislature from Columbia County, and served one term. At the commencement of the Rebellion he was appointed by President Lincoln internal revenue assessor for the Thirteenth Congressional District of Pennsylvania, and served about two years, when he resigned and accepted the appointment of revenue collector for Columbia and Montour Counties, which he held for three years, after which he was re-elected justice of Catawissa, which office he still holds. His wife was the mother of ten children, five of whom are still living, viz: Burton W., Alem B., Alice M. Millard, John W. and Sadie Myers. Four of her sons were in the army, either as volunteers or enlisted, one of whom died in the service in Camp Mary, near Washington, D. C., named Harrison FORTNER. B. P. FORTNER's father married Sarah BROOKE, whose father lived in Columbia Co, Penn. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 400)

CLARK F. HARDER, contractor and builder, Catawissa, was born in Columbia County, Penn., September 28, 1841, a son of Thomas and Catherine (FEISTER) HARDER, natives of Pennsylvania. His grandparents were among the first settlers of Catawissa Township, being here before the massacre at Wyoming. His maternal grandfather came direct from Germany to this country, and his paternal grandparents from Switzerland. His grandfather HARDER was a blacksmith, which trade he followed a number of years. His grandfather FEISTER kept a hotel for a number of years where the Catawissa House now stands. They both took quite an active part in politics, the former being a Democrat and the latter a Whig. Our subject's father was born in Catawissa Township, and when quite young learned the blacksmith's trade which he carried on a number of years and also followed farming. He owned a farm in Catawissa Township. He was a Republican in politics. He died in 1860. Our subject was only fourteen years of age when his father died, and he then remained with his mother until her death in 1872. At sixteen years of age he began to learn the carpenter and cabinet-maker's trades, which he had just mastered when the war broke out. August 6, 1862, he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty-second Pennsylvania Volunteers in the nine months' service. He served eight months, participated in the battle of Antietam, and after that engagement was detailed to take care of the wounded, but was taken ill and removed to the convalescent camp in Virginia, where later on he was discharged on account of disability. After his discharge he went to Washington and wanted to join his regiment, but was refused. He arrived home one month before the return of his regiment and tried again to enlist, but would not be taken on account of disability. He then resumed his trade which he has since followed. In 1866 he built a planing-mill which he has since operated, and is doing a good business. He built seventeen houses in the summer of 1885, furnishing all his own materials and has erected more houses in Catawissa than any other man. He formerly owned seven houses and lots, but has sold off until he now owns but two, also a lot 100x80 feet on which his mill and wareroom (the letter 20x65 feet, two stories in height) stand. Mr. HARDER married, March 11, 1868, Sarah HAYHURST, granddaughter of Stephen BALDY, and they are the parents of five children: Err, Edwin, Bessie, Jennie and Robert. Mr. and Mrs. HARDER are members of the Lutheran Church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., No. 60, Catawissa, and G. A. R., No. 170. He has held all the offices in the Odd Fellows lodge, having passed all the chairs. Mr. HARDER is Republican in political views. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 400)

THOMAS E. HARDER, proprietor of the mammoth furniture store, furnishing undertaker and embalmer, Catawissa, was born in Catawissa Township, this county, in December, 1843, a son of Washington and Mary (McALLISTER) HARDER, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His grandfather Err was a blacksmith, and died in Catawissa. Our subject's father was born in Catawissa, this county, and was a wheelwright, which occupation he followed the most of his life. He died here in 1861. Our subject was brought up in Catawissa, where he attended school and learned the cabinet-maker's trade, which he followed until going into business for himself. He started on a small scale, and his business grew to such an extent that in 1883 he built a large four-story stone building, with basement and attic, at a cost of about $15,000. He manufactures furniture in the basement, and the balance of the building is stored with goods common to his line. His stock of furniture is valued at $12,000. this building is a magnificent one, and the largest in this section of the country, which shows that Mr. HARDER's business has been a success, and that he has won the confidence of the people by his honesty and low figures. He manufactures a great deal of furniture, and does painting of all kinds. He is also engaged in the undertaking business. He married, in January, 1873, Clara HAMLIN, by whom he has three children: Charles M., Guy W. and Pearl. Mr. HARDER is a member of the Masonic fraternity, M. S. of A. and G. A. R., No. 170. In 1862 he enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty-second Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, serving nine months; was in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and at the end of nine months entered the Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry as second lieutenant; was detached as sergeant-major of his regiment, which commission he held about three months during an emergency. He then enlisted in Company D, Third Heavy Artillery, and served two years. He was on detached service as paymaster's clerk, but previous to getting that charge served in the front at Fort Spring Hill, and subsequently at Dutch Gap Canal, but no very heavy engagements occurred. Mr. HARDER, during his campaign, marched through Maryland, West Virginia and Pennsylvania, and during the battle of Gettysburg his regiment was to the left at Carlyle, and no doubt Harrisburg would have been captured had it not been that his regiment aided to the success and headed the enemy off. Gen Smith was the division general. Mr. HARDER was a brave soldier, and never flinched where duty called. He is now one of the most successful business men in this vicinity, and one of the leading men of Columbia County. He takes no part in politics, but sides with the Republicans.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 401)

NELSON C. HARTMAN, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in this county December 8, 1845, a son of Moses and Rebecca (CLAYTON) HARTMAN, the parents of the latter being among the early settlers of this county. Her ancestors came from Scotland and her husband's from Germany. Our subject's grandfather, Casper, was born in this county, his father coming directly from Germany, and settling where Nelson C. now resides about 1760, and taking up a section of land. At the outbreak of the Revolution he was thought by many to have been a Tory; he was a man of few words, strong ideas, orthodox in religion, and strongly opposed to war, but when the crisis came and one side or the other had to be recognized, his sympathies were with the American colonies. He was a tanner by trade, tanned hides for the Indians, and prepared all kinds of furs. He lived here until his death, after which the estate was divided, and Casper, the grandfather of our subject, got a third of the homestead and lived on it until his death. One of his sons moved on the great-grandfather's place. Our subject's father was born on the homestead of his father and after years bought the place where our subject now lives. He resided there about thirty years, but in his later days moved to Catawissa, where he died in 1871. He was the father of four children, three of whom are living: Harriet, wife of Nelson JOHN, residing in Minnesota; Deborah, deceased; Nelson C., and Jane, wife of J. M. SMITH, residing in Catawissa. Nelson C. was reared on a farm and remained at home until twenty years of age, when he went West through Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota and as far as the Rocky Mountains. after an absence of one year he returned home and was employed on the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad as fireman for four years. He abandoned that, however, and went on the farm, where he now lives. Here he owns about 200 acres of good land. February 16, 1870, he married Alice, daughter of Andrew and Anna (BOONE) CLARK, and they are the parents of two children, Andrew C. and Harry Garfield. Mrs. HARTMAN is a member of the Baptist Church. Mr. HARTMAN has served as school director several years. He has one of the finest farms in this section and one of the best residences, with all the latest improvements.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 401)

REV. DAVID M. HENKEL, D. D., Catawissa, was born in Point Pleasant, Monas Co., W. Va., April 12, 1820, and is a son of Rev. Charles and Mary (SIEGRIST) HENKEL, natives of West Virginia. The first of the family to come to this country was Gearhart HENKEL, who came from Frankfort, Germany, and who served as chaplain under Duke ___ (not now known), and located at Germantown, Philadelphia, in 1735, where he resided until his death, which was occasioned by an accident. He was found by the roadside dead, and the supposition was that his horse had thrown him. He was a Lutheran minister. The generations back are Gearhart, Justice, Jacob, Paul, Charles and David M., the last being the sixth generation, and it may be stated that a number of the ancestors were Lutheran ministers. Paul, the grandfather, was the father of six sons, five of whom were ministers, and one a physician. The grandfather died in New Market, Shenandoah Co., Va., in 1825. Our subject's father was the first Lutheran minister in Columbus, Ohio. He moved from Columbus to Somerset, Ohio, where he lived until his death, which occurred in 1840. Our subject was still young when his parents moved to Columbus, Ohio, and was educated at the Capital University of that place, where he also received his theological training. He graduated in 1849 and was ordained a pastor of the Lutheran Church. His first charge was at Goshen, Ind., when it was yet a wild state. He remained here only eighteen months, when he was forced to leave on account of sickness, and returned to the valley of Virginia until he had recuperated, when he took the charge at Stewartsville, N. J. In 1859 he was called to Danville, Montour County, there organized and built Trinity Lutheran Church and served as its pastor eight years. He was then called to Stroudsburg, Monroe Co., Penn., where he organized and built St. John's church, in that county, and remained as its pastor four years. He was then sent to Richmond, Va., to build up an English church, but his health failing him he was unable to accomplish his undertaking. He then moved to Mount Pleasant, N. C.; thence to Nokomis, Ill., where he remained six years, and, failing in health, he in 1882 moved to Catawissa, where he has no regular charge, but still delivers sermons. Mr. HENKEL is a very able speaker, and has been engaged in this good cause since 1848. He married first, in September, 1849, Heleah HENKEL, who bore him six children: Mary, wife of Rev. C. W. SIFFERD; Leah, wife of Rev. A. L. YOUNT; Charles, married to Miss LEASE, of Nokomis, Ill.; Solon, William and Luther. Mrs. HENKEL died in 1873, and he next married, in November, 1875, Susan C. EYER, eldest daughter of Rev. W. J. EYER, of Catawissa, who was born in 1803, and came to Catawissa in 1838. He served as minister in the Lutheran Church until his death in 1874. Mr. EYER was a noted man, an able speaker, and his death was deeply felt by his friends and family. Mrs. HENKEL's grandfather, Frederick C. HAVEMEYER, opened a sugar refinery in the city of New York in 1823, and made it one of the largest concerns in that city. It is still in the HAVEMEYER name, and the family is also connected with a sugar refinery in Philadelphia. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 402)

MINNER HILE, traveling salesman for A. A. Shumway & Co., of Philadelphia, Penn., was born in Northumberland county, Penn., January 23, 1834, and is a son of James and Hannah (CAMPBELL) HILE, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His great-grandfather, Henry HILE, came from Germany and located near Sunbury, Northumberland Co., Penn., where he owned and cultivated two farms. He moved to Clearfield County and bought a farm where he resided until his death. Our subject's father, a native of Northumberland County, Penn., was a farmer, and resided near Sunbury for a number of years, when he moved to Clearfield County, where he followed farming until 1866 (previously he came to this county and bought a farm of 220 acres, in 1856, in Franklin Township, which he still carries on). He is seventy-seven years of age. Our subject was reared on a farm and at the age of twenty-four years, married and moved to Franklin Township, this county, where he engaged in farming for about four years. He then bought a farm in Catawissa Township, moved on it, farmed and operated a dairy. He was the first man to start a dairy in Catawissa, and continued it three years and two weeks. In 1869 he moved to Philadelphia, where he was employed by a wholesale tea firm for a short time. Then moved back to Catawissa, this county, and he and his brother, Amos, started a dry goods and grocery store in the place which they conducted six years. He was engaged with a Reading boot and shoe house for about four years, as traveling salesman. In 1877 he was employed by A. A. Shumway & Co., boot and shoe dealers of Philadelphia, as traveling salesman, and is still in their employ. He married, April 22, 1859, Hannah FOX, who has borne him three children: Elizabeth (wife of E. G. SANBURN, Jersey City), Anna B., and Elmer, who carries on a boot and shoe store in Catawissa. Mr. and Mrs. HILE are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In politics he is a Democrat. Mr. HILE owns a house and lot in Catawissa. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 402)

ALFRED HOWER, teacher, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Numidia, Penn., November 10, 1851, a son of Michael and Catherine (BACHMAN) HOWER, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His great-grandfather settled in Catawissa about the latter part of the eighteenth century and was one of the first settlers in this part of the country. He owned about 1,000 acres and lived and died here. Our subject's grandfather Sebastian was reared on the homestead, and while young learned the carpenter's trade, but later bought a farm near Slabtown in Locust Township, where he lived until his death which occurred in 1860. Our subject's father was reared near Slabtown, but had lived in the coal regions a part of this time. He moved to Numidia, where he lived until his death in 1882. He was a blacksmith, which trade he followed the most of his life; also carried on farming to some extent. At the age of eighteen our subject learned the carpenter's trade at Shamokin, Penn., where he worked about a year. Previous to learning this trade he had taught two terms of school, and after completing his apprenticeship, again taught in the winter and went to school in the summer. He attended Bloomsburg Normal School, Greenwood's Seminary and Lowell's Commercial College at Binghampton, and graduated in 1874. In the fall of 1877 he moved to Catawissa, and resided here four years, teaching school. In 1882 he moved to Orangeville where he lived two years, having the principalship of the graded school. In the spring of 1884 he moved back to Catawissa where he has since lived, engaged in teaching in the winter and working at this trade in the summer. He owns two houses and lots, and is at present engaged in building a two-story frame house. He married, December 4, 1877, Isabella, daughter of John T. and Catherine (BREISCH) SHUMAN. MR. and Mrs. HOWER are the parents of four children: John S., Lillian C, Laura Jennie and Warren A. Mr. and Mrs. HOWER are members of the Lutheran Church. One of Mr. HOWER's relatives was buried in the cemetery here in 1802. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 403)

PETER KERN, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Warren County, N. J., November 17, 1817, a son of John and Gertrude (RIDGEWAY) KERN, both of whom were born in Warren County, N. J., and were of German descent. His grandparents on both sides came from Germany, emigrating direct to Pennsylvania, where, however, they took up land and lived until their deaths. The grandfather died in his eighty-fifth year. He and his wife were highly educated in the old country. Our subject's father was born in Warren County, N. J., in 1809 and was in his sixty-eighth year when he died. He was reared to farming which he followed all his life. Peter was reared on the homestead in his native State, where he remained until married, when he and his father-in-law came to Pennsylvania and bought a tract of land where he now resides. This was in 1840. the tract was a very large one, and when it was sold Mr. KERN bought 120 acres of the estate on which he has since lived. He married, August 23, 1839, Jane DAVISON, a native of New Jersey, by whom he had seven children, five of whom are living: Emma, wife of George TEITSWORTH; Martha, widow of Hiram COOL (Mr. COOL was wounded in the service of his country at the battle of Antietam, a bullet entering under his eye and coming out at the back of his neck; he suffered from this for seven years, at times in intense pain, and died November 10, 1870. His widow and three children make their home with Mr. KERN--Albert L., married to Matilta Rue; Ida, married to Wm. B. SNYDER, and Norman G., a graduate of Bloomsburg Normal School); Easic D., married to Loretta REINBOLD; John B., married to Hannah TRAUB; Margaret, wife of Rev. John B. BODINE; Jane and Lemuel are deceased. Mrs. KERN died April 1, 1884, deeply lamented by her husband. He is a member of he church; in politics a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 403)

LUTHER B. KLINE, M. D., physician and surgeon, Catawissa, was born in Rush Township, Northumberland County, this State, December 24, 1842, and is a son of Harmon G. and Mary (BASSETT) KLINE, natives of Pennsylvania and of German-Scotch descent. His grandparents came from New Jersey to Northumberland County at an early day, and engaged in farming until their death. Harmon G. KLINE is a farmer and resides in Northumberland County, near Sunbury, where he owns a farm. Luther B. was reared on a farm until about eighteen years of age, when he taught school several years, and also attended the Sunbury Academy. In the fall of 1865 he entered Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, from which he graduated in March, 1867. In April following he came to Catawissa, where he began his now extensive practice and has since resided. He married, September 14, 1870, Desda W., daughter of J. K. and Mary M. SHARPLESS. they are the parents of four children, two living: Charles S. and Grace E. Dr. and Mrs. KLINE are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 349, Catawissa; has held the office of school director and is now serving his second term. Dr. KLINE is a member of the State Medical Society and Incorporated County Medical Society. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 403)

WILLIAM J. MARTIN, farmer and brickmaker, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Saxony, Germany, April 24, 1825, a son of John and Catherine (KEEL) MARTIN, natives of Germany, the former being a farmer. When fourteen years of age our subject left school and learned the cutler's trade, at which he worked until nineteen years of age. He and his brother, Charles, then took passage in a sailing vessel bound for America, and after a voyage of six weeks landed in New York. There they separated, Charles going to Delaware, while our subject remained in New York and worked at his trade for two years. He then went up the Hudson and engaged in the manufacture of hames, receiving $1.50 per day, but after six months, not liking his associates, he returned to New York. There he again worked at his trade, receiving $3 per week and his board. In 1856 he moved to Danville, Penn., and worked in a rolling-mill one year, then came to Columbia County and hired on the farm of Judge BALDY, which he now owns; then worked a year for A. FETEROLF; then, March 4, 1860, he married Susan M., daughter of Judge BALDY, and here has since remained. Our subject and wife have four children: Sarah B., George B. (married to Rebecca FETTERMAN, and residing in Bloomsburg, this county), Stephen B. and Lizzie. Mr. and Mrs. MARTIN and family are members of the Lutheran Church. He owns 140 acres of cleared land and 100 acres of mountain land. In 1883 he commenced the manufacture of brick, which he has since carried on. Mr. MARTIN introduced the "Martin Amber Wheat," in 1878, and took it to the Philadelphia State fair, where he sold it for ten cents per grain. He has taken the first premium in wheat at every fair for the county and State. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 404)

REV. U. MYERS, P. O. Catawissa, was born near Easton, Northumberland Co., Penn., January 23, 1847, son of Abraham and Mary (ROOT) MYERS, natives of Pennsylvania and of German-English descent. His great-grandfather on the maternal side came from Germany and located in Bucks County, where he followed farming, and his grandfather, Philip, was a cabinet-maker and also carried on farming until his death at an advanced age, in 1883, near Easton. Our subject's father was for a number of years a justice of the peace at Bethlehem, Penn., but is now living a retired life. During his early life, in the Mexican war, he organized a militia company of which he was captain, and waited for orders, but was never called out, although he stood ready. He was captain in the militia for a term of years, also assisted in drilling companies during the civil war. He is now about sixty-eight years of age. Our subject was brought up as a clerk until about sixteen years of age, when he entered upon and pursued a course of study for the ministry. He then taught a number of terms, holding a State professional certificate. He entered the work of the ministry as a home missionary in 1868, and after continuing in the good cause for one year was ordained a pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in 1869, but continued in the mission work for eighteen months later. His first charge was organized by his efforts in Lycoming County, Penn., along the Allegheny Mountains. In 1870 he was called to a large field of labor at Turbotville, Northumberland Co., Penn., and there remained during a successful ministry of nine years. In 1880 he was called to Seneca County, N. Y., where he labored two and one-half years, when, suffering from an attack of pneumonia, he was compelled to rest, spending one year near Muncy, Penn. In May, 1883, he took charge of St. Matthew's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Catawissa, and has since been laboring here with acceptance and abundant success. He has taken a great interest, wherever he has labored, in the building of new churches, and since coming here the church has been rebuilt and nicely furnished, while the membership has been doubled. Rev. Mr. MYERS was married October 11, 1870, to Sadie J., daughter of Isaac and Mary (SECHLER) BEEBER, of Muncy, Penn. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 404)

DAVID R. RANDALL was born August 21, 1818, in Cheshire County, N. H., and died August 31, 1875. His father, Joseph RANDALL, was a farmer, and moved to McDonough, Chenango Co., N. Y., when David was about six years of age. Some eight years later his father died, leaving him the eldest child and only son of a family of eight children, and but little property. Young RANDALL thus found himself, at the age of fifteen, the head of a family who looked to him for support, with nothing to assist him in the struggle of life but his own perseverance of character, guided by the counsel of a devoted mother and the kind hand of a beneficent Providence. Left thus with seven sisters, he struggled on to support the family and educate himself. Daylight found him at his work, night at his books by the light of pine faggots. In this way he educated himself and supported his mother and sisters till he arrived at the age and acquired the necessary education to enable him to become a teacher, having passed a most flattering graduation from Oxford Academy, Oxford, N. Y. As a teacher he labored with the same energy that had characterized him from boyhood, and at the age of twenty-six was elected superintendent of common schools for the county of Chenango. His labors in behalf of the common schools of Luzerne County, Penn., will ever be gratefully remembered by that people. Devoting his time and efforts to the cause of education in this capacity for two years, he then concluded to enter upon the study of law, and accordingly entered his name as a student in the office of Hon. Ransom BALCOMB, now one of the judges of the supreme court of the State of New York. This was in 1843, and he continued to read law with Judge BALCOMB until 1846, being obliged, however, to devote much time to teaching to support his family. In 1846 Mr. RANDALL left his home and came to Hyde Park, Luzerne Co. (now Lackawanna County), commencing here to build up his fortune by teaching, and soon afterward entered his name as a law student with Charles H. SILKMAN, Esq., of Providence, now a portion of the city of Scranton. He was admitted to the bar of Luzerne County November 4, 1847, and opened an office at Providence, where soon his frank manners and ready business tact brought him clients, whose numbers increased up to the time of his sickness. Mr. RANDALL had all his life been a Democrat and in the fall of 1860 he was nominated as a candidate for Congress by the Democracy of the Twelfth Congressional District of Pennsylvania, composed of the counties of Luzerne, Wyoming, Columbia and Montour. His opponent was Hon. George W. Scranton, the strongest man by all odds in his party, and who defeated Mr. RANDALL by a majority of 695 in the district where Col. Scranton had two years before received a majority of 3, 980. Upon the death of Hon. e. B. CHASE, the district attorney of Luzerne County, Mr. RANDALL was appointed February 18, 1864, by Judge CONYNGHAM, district attorney of the county until the next election. Upon receiving this appointment he removed to Wilkesbarre, the county seat. When the Democratic convention met in the fall of the same year he was unanimously nominated as the candidate for district attorney. He received a majority of 2,235 in the county. This was the last time he suffered his name to go before the people as a candidate for office. Upon the incorporation of the city of Wilkesbarre in 1871, Mr. RANDALL was appointed chief assessor of the city by Hon. Garrick M. HARDING, a Republican judge, upon the unanimous recommendation of the members of the city council and the commissioners of the county, serving until his death. Mr. RANDALL was twice married, August 25, 1849, to Mary CHILD, who bore him four children (none of whom are living), and died February 7, 1855. March 5, 1856, he married Miss Elizabeth S. EMERSON, of McDonough, N. Y., who survives him. She bore him seven children, of whom two sons, Charles E. and David V., and two daughters, Nettie E. and Jennie M., survive him. The qualities of the deceased endured him to his friends and commanded the respect of all who knew him. He was a true friend and generous foe. Bluff, hearty and outspoken in his dealings with is fellows, he was honored and beloved, and has now left to his children the priceless legacy of an unstained name. The grave, dark and silent, has shut up from sight his manly form. His firm step and cheerful voice will be heard no more in the haunts of men; but the memory of his generous deeds, his kindly ways, his warm friendship, his hearty humor, and his sturdy courage will be long remembered by those who knew him.-Extract from Luzerne Legal Register. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 405)

CHARLES E. RANDALL, of the firm of RANDALL & YOCUM, editors and proprietors of the Catawissa News Item, Catawissa, was born in Providence, Luzerne Co., Penn., November 4, 1856, a son of David R. and Elizabeth (EMERSON) RANDALL. (See sketch.) His maternal grandfather, Moses EMERSON, a merchant and miller, was a native of New Hampshire. His paternal grandfather, Joseph RANDALL, was also a native of New Hampshire and was a farmer. Our subject received his education at Wilkesbarre and at the age of seventeen had finished his course in the high school at that place, and was given his choice of a profession or a trade. He chose the latter and entered the office of the Luzerne Union, under H. B. BEARDSLEE, where he served an apprenticeship of four years, after which he worked at his trade two years. In the fall of 1881 he came to Catawissa and was employed as foreman of the Catawissa News Item until October, 1884. At that date he and John C. YOCUM, Esq., purchased the office of G. E. MYERS, and have since been the owners and proprietors of the News Item, Mr. RANDALL conducting the editorial department and office in general. The paper is a newsy sheet, 24x36, seven columns, and has a circulation of 1,500. the office is supplied with a three-horse power engine, and is the best equipped and only one operated by steam in the county. In September, 1880, Mr. RANDALL married Lizzie M., daughter of Elijah and Sarah SEARCH, and one child has blessed their union, Eugene Y. Mr. RANDALL edits the paper independent in politics, is well adapted to his chosen profession and gives satisfaction to all his readers. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 405)

GEORGE W. REIFSNYDER, merchant, Catawissa, born in Schuylkill County, Penn., March 24, 1848, a son of George and Harriet (SHARPLESS) REIFSNYDER, natives of Pennsylvania and of German-English descent. His grandfather came from England; was one of the settlers under William Penn. His grandfather, Benjamin SHARPLESS, came to Catawissa at an early day and was one of the founders of the paper-mill here, and also of the Quaker church; he owned and operated the mill for a number of years and died at the age of ninety-four years. Our subject's father was born in Montgomery County, this State, in 1804, and lived there but a short time; thence moved to Perry County and thence to this county, where he engaged in mercantile business for several years. He then moved to Schuylkill County and located at New Castle, where he carried on mercantile business, and there resided until he reared his family, which consisted of twelve children, five of whom are living: Mrs. William HARTMAN, Mrs. E. S. JACKSON, (a resident of Scranton), George W. (our subject), Mrs. Isaac HARTMAN (a resident of Ontario, Canada), and Mrs. Charles PEARSON (a resident of Berlin, Ontario). The father died in 1856. Our subject was about nine years of age when he came to Catawissa where he received his education. In 1874 he engaged in conducting the Susquehanna hotel which he continued proprietor of until 1882, when he embarked in mercantile business. He carries a general line of dry goods and groceries, his stock being valued at about $5,000. He married in December, 1870, Anna KOSTENBAUDER, by whom he has had five children, three living: Samuel, Leonard and Karl. Mr. and Mrs. REIFSNYDER are members of the Lutheran Church; he is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the G. A. R. In 1862 he enlisted in the State militia, and in January, 1864, enlisted in the Third Pennsylvania Artillery, and served until 1865; was one year on picket duty continuously, and the rest of the time served on detached duty; he served two years in the militia and regular service. He owns several properties in Catawissa; he is the best pigeon shot in the county. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 405)

SOLOMON RIDER, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Montour County, Penn., in June, 1827, a son of John and Betsey (BERKHART) RIDER, natives of Berks County, Penn., and of German descent. His father came here at an early day and settled in Montour County, where he lived several years and then moved to Lycoming County, where he bought a farm and resided until his death in his eighty-eighth year. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mrs. Betsey RIDER died in her eighty-sixth year. she was the mother of fourteen children, twelve of whom are living: John; Katie (wife of Daniel SHULER); Samuel; Sarah (deceased); Peggy (wife of Daniel MILLER, residing in Lycoming County, Penn.); Lawrence; Daniel (residing in Lycoming County); Rachel (wife of Cleaver DAVIS, residing in the West); Susan (wife of Jacob HERTMAN); Jacob (deceased); Solomon; Mary and Hannah, (twins). Our subject was only six years of age when his father moved to Lycoming county and when eighteen years of age he came to Schuylkill County, located at Ashland and remained there about ten years, being engaged as stable foreman. He then came to Columbia County and bought a farm where his son-in-law now lives, and there resided for three years, when he sold out and bought the farm of 112 acres adjoining; moved on it and there has since lived. He married, in October, 1848, Hannah LEIBY, and nine children were born to them, two living; Mary J. (wife of William DAVIS) and Martin. Mrs. RIDER is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In politics Mr. RIDER is a Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 406)

WILLIAM H. ROBERTS, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Montour Township, this county, April 28, 1846, a son of Josiah A. and Anna M. (CLEWELL) ROBERTS, natives of Columbia County, and of Welsh-German descent. His grandfather, Edward, was reared near Philadelphia, and came to Columbia County at an early day, where he settled and cleared up a farm and resided until his death. He was found dead, after a storm, between Catawissa and his home, and the supposition is that he was killed by lightning. He started out to purchase a knife for his grandson (our subject) but never returned. Subject's father was also born in Montour Township and was reared a farmer. He is master of four trades, being a stone-mason, stone-cutter, plasterer and brick-layer. He owns a farm in Montour Township, and is the father of eleven children, nine of whom are living: William H., Harvey, Arthur, Sarah, Edward, David, Anna, Clarence and Joseph E. William H. was reared on the farm, and attended school until after he was twenty-one years of age. He worked for Sloan, in Bloomsburg, this county, a short time, and then started out for himself. After marriage he located near Danville, Montour Co., Penn., on a farm, where he lived one year. He was appointed keeper of the Columbia County poorhouse, but, finding it unsuitable to his taste, after one year moved back to the farm and remained three years. He then resided two years in Mechanicsville, Penn., and then moved on the HOLLINGSHEAD farm where he remained for one year. In 1884 he bought the farm where he now resides, and which consists of 140 acres. This property is the old homestead of his mother. He married, in September, 1868, Ellen BARND, a daughter of Charles and Elizabeth BARND. They are the parents of nine children: Charles, Josiah, Frank, Andrew, May, Elizabeth, Mattie, Lutora and Roy. Mr. and Mrs. ROBERTS are members of the German Reformed Church; politically he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 406)

JOHN K. ROBINS, M.D., P. O. Catawissa, was born in Sunbury, Northumberland County, April 14, 1820. His parents, Aaron and Rebecca (RICHARDSON) ROBINS, were natives of Pennsylvania and of English descent. His paternal ancestors came from England to this country with Wm. Penn. His paternal ancestors are traced to three brothers, who came to this country from England; two of them remained at Rhode Island, and the other came to Philadelphia, Penn. His grandfather, Joseph RICHARDSON, went into the Revolutionary war when about eighteen years of age, was wounded at the battle of Brandywine and suffered from lameness the rest of his life. About the time of the Revolution he had begun the study of medicine; but after that struggle turned his attention to farming, and owned two farms near Danville. Our subject's father was a contractor and builder, which occupation he followed all his life. He built the abutments for the Sunbury dam, which was a noted piece of work. He owned 200 acres of land in Michigan, a farm near Sunbury, another at Union Corners, a number of town and city properties in different places, and was quite wealthy at his death, which occurred in Sunbury in 1843. John K. remained at home and attended the schools of his neighborhood. At the age of twenty years he commenced the study of medicine and graduated in the allopathic course at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1842. In April of the same year he went to Shamokin, Penn., where he soon had a good practice and remained three years. In January, 1846, he removed to Catawissa, where he has since enjoyed a very large practice. In 1874 he took his son, William B., who is also a graduate of Jefferson Medical College, into partnership with him, and the firm has since been known as John K. ROBINS & Son. Dr. ROBINS married, in November, 1847, Jane, daughter of Joseph BROBST. Five children have been born to their union: Mary, wife of A. H. SHARPLESS; Ada; William B., married to Emma CLEAVER; Joseph and Rebecca. Dr. ROBINS is a member of the Episcopal Church, and also of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 349, Chapter 272. He has held nearly all the offices of the Blue Lodge and Chapter, and is a member of the Crusade Knight Templars at Danville. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 406)

CAPT. I. H. SEESHOLTZ, merchant, Catawissa, was born in Catawissa, Columbia Co., Penn., November 14, 1837, a son of Philip and Mary (HULL) SEESHOLTZ. His father was a native of Pennsylvania and his mother of New Jersey, and both were of German descent. His paternal grandfather came from Germany and located in Northumberland County, near Sunbury, where he owned a farm and cultivated it until his death. Subject's farther, a native of Northumberland County, Penn., was a potter, which trade he followed a number of years. He came to Columbia County about 1830 and located in Roaringcreek, where he resided several years, and then moved to Catawissa, bought property and followed his trade a few years. He then bought a couple of farms and turned his attention to agriculture, which he followed until his death in 1872. He lived in one house over fifty years; was a Republican in politics. He was the father of the following named children; Matilda, Phfaler, Jeremiah S., Christian B., James M., Edmund H., Isaac H., William (who was killed at the battle of the Wilderness), and Sarah C. SHARPLESS. Our subject attended school until 1859, when he read medicine and attended two courses of lectures at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Sixth P. R. V. C., "Iron Guards," and served under Capt. Wallace RICKETS. He was appointed and served as second lieutenant six months; resigned and enlisted in Company H, Ninety-ninth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was soon commissioned first lieutenant; in a short time he resigned and joined Company C, One Hundred and Eighteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and rose to the position of captain. In June, 1865, he was mustered out. He participated in nearly all of the battles of the Army of the Potomac; was wounded September 20, 1862, at Shepardstown, Va., by a gunshot, which disabled him from duty for three or four months. He was again wounded by a gunshot in 1863, at Peeble's farm. Capt. SEESHOLTZ was a brave soldier, to which is due his promotion. At the close of the war he returned home and engaged in mercantile business, which he has since carried on. He keeps a general line of merchandise and fertilizers, and his stock is valued at $5,000, insured. He owns four houses and four town lots and his store building. He married, in November, 1880, Martha POLAND, and they have one child, Sarah P. Mr. and Mrs. SEESHOLTZ are members of the church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the G. A. R., Post 170; is serving as quartermaster, and has held most of the offices of the post. He is a member of the school board of which he was president in 1885, and is its present secretary. Politically he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 407)

GEORGE H. SHARPLESS, clerk, P. O. Catawissa, was born may 29, 1852, a son of John and Sarah Ann (HARDER) SHARPLESS, natives of Catawissa. Benjamin SHARPLESS, grandfather of our subject, came to this county while a young man, and was one of the originators of the Catawissa Paper Company, with which he was connected until his death in 1855. At the time of his death he was ninety-three years old, and his wife had preceded him a number of years. They are buried in the Quaker Cemetery at Catawissa. Our subject's father was reared in Catawissa, and in early life was employed in the paper-mills. He erected the building which is now known as "the corner drug store," there kept a general stock of goods and operated the store until his death in 1868. He is buried in Greenwood Cemetery, Catawissa. His wife died in 1852 and is buried in the Quaker Cemetery at Catawissa. Both were members of the Society of Friends. Our subject was reared in Catawissa and received his early education in the schools of that place. In 1861 he entered the Kingston Seminary where he spent two years, and in his nineteenth year became a student at the Westchester Classical Institute, where he also spent two years. He then returned to Columbia County and commenced business in a store, building on what was then known as "the WILLETTS farm," but now as "the SHARPLESS farm." He continued in this place doing business for three years, when he came to Catawissa and entered the employ of C. F. HARDER, with whom he remained until taking his present position with A. S. TRUCKENMILLER, in May, 1886. He was married at Catawissa November 23, 1873, to Miss Ella SCHMICK, a native of Norristown, Penn., and a daughter of Daniel and Catherine (BALDY) SCHMICK, natives of Catawissa, where the latter still resides, the former having died in Norristown, in 1855, where he was general manager of the canal. Mr. and Mrs. SHARPLESS have four children: John, Gilbert, Kate and Anna. The parents are members of the Lutheran Church. In politics he is a Republican-Democrat. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 407)

FRANKLIN L. SHUMAN, associate judge, Catawissa, was born in Beaver Valley, Penn., October 6, 1834, a son of Christian and Elizabeth (HENDERSHOT) SHUMAN, both natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His great-grandfather came from Germany at an early day. His paternal grandfather, John, was one of the early settlers of Catawissa Township, and here purchased a farm where he lived until his death. He was a leading citizen and a substantial Democrat. Our subject's father, Christian, was born and reared in Catawissa, and when about eighteen years of age, moved to Northampton County, this State, where he learned the tanner's trade and worked at it some time. He then moved to Beaver Valley, this county, where he bought a mill property, which he operated several years, and also carried on tanning. In 1855 he entered mercantile business at the same place. He owned three farms, a grist-mill, tannery, store and hotel, all of which he had in operation at the same time. He at one period possessed considerable wealth, but owing to misfortunes it was very much reduced at the time of his death. As a Democrat he took a deep interest in politics, and, although never an aspirant for office, had a great influence over his Democratic friends. His death occurred in 1885. Our subject was reared in Beaver Valley, this county, where he attended school until he had reached the age of nineteen years. Being of a very ambitious character he longed for something higher and made up his mind to do something for himself. He commenced to work for his father at one thing or another on his farm, in the store and the mill, and so continued until he was married, when he engaged in the lumber business, keeping hotel at Beaver Valley, which industry he carried on until 1873. In the meantime he had owned a half dozen farms, but disposed of them, except twenty acres adjoining Catawissa, which he still retains. In 1870 he built a house in Catawissa into which he moved, but which was destroyed by fire June 7, 1885. He then erected a large two-story frame house, built on the same spot, in which he lives at present. He had only resided here a short time after his first move when sickness attacked his family, and he was compelled to abandon his home here and seek other quarters. However he was not long in making up his mind, so he moved back to his old home in Beaver Valley, and again embarked in mercantile business, to which he soon after added coal trade, also carrying on a number of trades while living here. He moved back to Catawissa in 1875 where he has since lived. In 1881 he bought the ZARR farm, which consisted of forty acres, adjoining Catawissa, and laid it out in town lots, which is known as "SHUMAN's addition," on which there have been erected over 100 houses within the last few years. The schoolhouse, one of the finest in the county, is also built on this addition. In 1884 he put in water-works in the town, which he and his sons control and are the individual owners of, although, under a chartered company, it is all in the SHUMAN family. In the fall of 1885 he laid out a new cemetery in Catawissa in the east end of SHUMAN's addition. In 1876 he was elected associate judge, and after serving his first term and performing his duty so manfully, he was re-elected in 1881, and is now serving his second term. He has also been justice of the peace several terms. He married, July 27, 1854, Angeline, daughter of Minessa and Susanna (HOSLER) MICHAEL and to them have been born four children, only one of whom survives--Paris H., married to Ada BOYER. Mr. and Mrs. SHUMAN are members of the St. John's Lutheran Church. In politics he is a Democrat. He has probably done more for Catawissa since living here in the way of building it up than any other man in the vicinity. In educational interests, public improvements and all that pertains to progress and advancement of the town, Mr. SHUMAN has taken an active and prominent part, and the record of his life will live, in the memory of those whose rugged ways he smoothed and softened, after he has passed away. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 408)

M. A. SWANK, merchant, Catawissa, was born in Catawissa Township, this county, May 6, 1845, a son of Jacob and Lydia (WATERHOUSE) SWANK, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His grandfather, George, lived in Northumberland County, Penn., where he owned a farm and followed agricultural pursuits all his life. Our subject's father was born in Northumberland County, and was a brick-maker by trade, which he followed until coming to this county, in 1838, and for a number of years thereafter. He was then employed by the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad for about eleven years; then took up farming and gardening, which he has followed since. He resides about two miles east of Catawissa, where he owns a farm; is now in his seventieth year, but hale and stout. He was the father of nine children, six of whom are now living: Sarah Getchey, Martin A., Wellington, Elwood, Clara Irwine and Anna Getchey. Our subject was reared on the farm, but, being crippled, never worked much on it. He attended school until he was about eighteen years old, and remained at home until the spring of 1877, when he engaged in mercantile business in Catawissa, and here has since remained. He carries a general line of groceries and dry goods valued at $5,000; has quite an extensive trade and is one of the leading merchants of the town. He married in 1881 Louisa GEIST, by whom he had two children: George and Ethel. Mr. and Mrs. SWANK attend the services of the Church. History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 408)

E. M. TEWKSBURY, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Brooklyn, Susquehanna Co., Penn., September 10, 1837, a son of Reuben and Martha (CORY) TEWKSBURY, the former a native of Vermont, the latter of Rhode Island. The family is of pure English descent, dating back to the early history of England. Among the London merchants was John TEWKSBURY, one of the oldest friends of the Scriptures in England. As early as 1512 he had become the possessor of a manuscript copy of the Bible and had attentively studied it. Being a man of understanding, clever in all he undertook, a ready and fluent speaker, and liking to get at the bottom of everything, TEWKSBURY, like Monmouth, became very influential in the city of London, and one of the most learned in the Scriptures of any of the evangelicals. Our subject's grandfather was born in Massachusetts. Reuben TEWKSBURY moved to Susquehanna County, Penn., with his father, Sergt. TEWKSBURY, in 1803, and there resided until his death in 1861. He was a farmer and owned a good farm. Our subject was reared on a farm, and remained with his parents until fifteen years of age, when he entered Harford University, Susquehanna County, Penn., from which he graduated after three years' hard study. His next pursuit was teaching school in Dauphin County, near Harrisburg, Penn., where he taught one term in the winter of 1855-56. In the summer of the latter year he came to this county and taught school in Catawissa Township. He was engaged in teaching school and farming up to 1869, when he bought the farm of 160 acres, where he has since remained. This farm was taken up in 1772 by David SHAKESPEARE, who bought it from Thomas and John PENN, proprietors of Pennsylvania. They paid L10 18 shillings for the whole tract of 218 acres. It is one of the oldest farms in the section, and is known as "SHAKESPEARE Springs," eighteen miles north of Ft. Augusta (Sunbury). This section was then in Northumberland County, and it is said to be the oldest title paper for many miles, having been patented during the reign of George III. The next deed was from David SHAKESPEARE to Joseph McINTYRE, recorded August 26, 1797, but was sold in 1796. The next transfer was a will and deed by Joseph McINTYRE to his heirs and deed of heirs to William McINTYRE, April 29, 1816. The first heirs were William McINTYERE, Mary (wife of John YOCUM), Rachel (wife of Jacob FOX), Patience, Sarah and Eleanor, and were the heirs among whom the estate was divided. The next deed is given by William McINTYRE, April 9, 1840, to William H. DAVISON, from New Jersey, the father of E. M. TEWKSBURY's wife. This deed covers a tract of about 400 acres. The next title is by a will made in 1849 by William H. DAVISON to his wife during her lifetime. After her death the farm fell to Barnett D., Jane (wife of Peter KERN), Mary (wife of John OSBURN), Elizabeth (wife of Lemuel TITSWORTH), Sarah C. (wife of Franklin TITSWORTH), and Ellen (wife of E. M. TEWKSBURY). This family was all born in New Jersey. The farm was divided among them in tracts by deed of above named heirs of William H. DAVISON, deceased, to Edward M. TEWKSBURY, bearing date April 1, 1869, who retains the 160 acres. One part of the original tract is owned by Peter KERN; 120 acres and sixty-five acres were deeded to BILLMEYER & Co. at the same date. Mr. TEWKSBURY was married July 3, 1858, by the Rev. D. J. WALLER, to Ellen DAVISON, by whom he has two children: Martha D. and Eugene D. The family are all members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. TWEKSBURY is a prominent and successful citizen. He was run over by a team of horses and suffers from lameness. In addition to his other business he operates a dairy, and has been in that business for nine years. He is a member of the Grange, in politics a Democrat; and now (1887) a member of the board of county auditors, having been elected by a leading vote on the ticket. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 408)

WILLIAM H. TUTHILL, yard-foreman of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Catawissa, was born in Orange County, N. Y., November 2, 1833, and is a son of Harris and Mary (DUZENBERY) TUTHILL, natives of the State of New York and of French-German descent. His grandfather was born in the above named State and was a farmer, as is also Harris TUTHILL, who is yet living in Orange County, N. Y. Our subject, at twenty-five years of age, went to Tioga County, N. Y., and engaged in farming five years. In the spring of 1864 he came to Catawissa and was employed by the Catawissa Railroad Company as a laborer with a gang of carpenters, building shops, and worked himself up to different positions until he was promoted yard-foreman, which office he has held for about seventeen years. He is one of the company's trustworthy men and an active railroad man. He was married in December, 1858, to A. E. CORNWALL, a native of the State of New York and they are the parents of one child, Mahala. They have an adopted daughter, Annie E. Mrs. TUTHILL is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. TUTHILL politically is a Democrat. He owns two houses and lots in Catawissa. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 409)

JOHN WALTZ, farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Shuylkill County, this State, September 21, 1830, a son of John and Magdalene (SCHMIDT) WALTZ. His father was a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and his mother of Alsace, France. The former left the old country about 1823, landed in Baltimore and then came to Chester County, this State, where he remained for some years; then moved to Schuylkill County, where he married and lived a number of years. He came to Columbia County, bought a lot in Maine Township, where he lived about fifteen years, when he moved to Mifflin Township, and there resided with his daughter until his death, at the age of eighty-three years. Our subject was reared in Schuylkill County until about five years of age, when he came to this county with his parents and remained with them until he was twenty-one. He was then employed on the Lehigh Valley Railroad for about fifteen years in Carbon County, this State. He then came to Catawissa and was employed by the Catawissa Railroad Company for about ten years. In 1871 he moved to where he now lives where he had previously bought a small farm. He at once commenced to improve the place and built a fine barn at a cost of $1,100. He now owns seventy acres of good land on which he does all kinds of trucking. Mr. WALTZ has the name of being the best berry ("Big Bob" and "Sharpless") raiser in this country, making it a specialty. He ships berries as far as California, and has raised some of the finest in the country, eight making a quart. He was married in 1857 to Anna L. SHUMAN, who bore him two children, Creighton S. and Alfretta H., and died in 1865. He next married, in 1869, Barbara RITTER. Mr. WALTZ and wife are members of the Evangelical Church. He formerly was a member of the K. of P. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 409)

W. G. YETTER, division engineer of the Catawissa division of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad, Catawisssa, was born in Columbia County, Penn., December 10, 1838, a son of Lewis and Harriet B. (GEARHART) YETTER, natives of Pennsylvania, and of German descent. His grandfather, John, a shoemaker by trade, lived in Catawissa, where he served as justice of the peace for a great many years. Our subject's great-grandfather, Samuel, came from Virginia and settled near Catawissa, where he followed farming until his death. He served as major under George Washington, and after the war located near Catawissa. Subject's father was born in 1811, and during his early life learned the trades of chairmaker and painter. He afterward took up surveying, which he followed about thirty-five years. He served for thirty-five years as justice of the peace, and as notary public for a long time, and had settled up some forty-five estates at the time of his death. He was a substantial Republican. He was the father of five children, three of whom are now living: William G., Albert and Mrs. Hannah A. DECKER. He died January 24, 1880. Our subject was brought up in Catawissa, and attended school until about twenty years of age, when he took up surveying under his father, and followed it until September 20, 1862. He was employed by the Catawissa Railroad Company as rodman, which position he held until 1865, when, on June 10 of that year, he was appointed roadmaster of the Catawissa division, a responsibility he held until 1877, when he was promoted to engineer, which office he held until 1882, when the title was changed to "division roadmaster" until 1885, when he received the title of "division engineer." While serving as roadmaster he did a great deal of railroad building for the company, and in 1871 built the extension line from Milton to Williamsport, and also several short branches. He has been an active railroad man since in the employ of the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad Company. He has an interest in the Catawissa Bridge Company, owns two houses and lots in Catawissa, and also two lots in the town. Mr. YETTER married, March 19, 1867, Diana, daughter of Seely and Sarah (SHOEMAKER) SWARTWOOD. Mr. and Mrs. YETTER are the parents of two children: Harriet and Harry. Mrs. YETTER is a member of the Lutheran Church. Mr. YETTER is widely known all over the State, is connected with the signal service, is prominent in his county, and has hosts of friends. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 410)

W. A. YETTER, proprietor of the Susquehanna House, Catawissa, was born in Mainville, Penn., June 11, 1849, a son of Isaac and Mary (KOSTENBANDER) YETTER, natives of the same State. His grandparents on both sides, farmers, came from Bucks County, Penn., to this county, where his paternal grandfather settled in Franklin Township and there died. Our subject's father first settled in Franklin Township, but later moved to Maine Township, where he still resides, and is now about eighty years of age; his wife died in November, 1885. They were parents of eleven children, of whom survive Elizabeth, wife of William HAUK; Esther, wife of William T. SHUMAN; Matilda, wife of John STOKES; Jacob B.; Alfred; Wright A. and Boyd. Our subject was reared on a farm, and at the age of eighteen learned telegraphy, and was given an office at Fairview on the Lehigh Valley Railroad. After a short time he was appointed telegraph operator and assistant freight agent on the Catawissa Railroad (now the Philadelphia & Reading Railroad), which position he held five months, when he was promoted to an agency at Ringtown, for the same company. He occupied that place about two years, when he accepted a position as operator on the Central Railroad of New Jersey, which, however, he resigned after a short time to accept a more remunerative one on the Lehigh & Susquehanna Railroad. With that company he remained five months, when he was appointed to a position with the Catawissa Railroad Company, and remained with them until 1872, when the road was changed to the Philadelphia & Reading. With the latter company he remained as station agent at Summit for about two years; then was transferred to Williamsport, where he acted as superintendent's clerk and car agent for three and a half years. He was then transferred to a better position and increased salary at Temple, Berks County, where he acted as station agent four years and a half. In September, 1883, he took charge of the "Susquehanna House" at Catawissa, which hotel he has since conducted, and which is first-class in every respect. Mr. YETTER married, November 10, 1875, Harriet REIFSNYDER KEILER, and five children were born to this union: Robert E., Hobert R., Desdamona, Marshall and Isaac. Mr. YETTER is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Lodge No. 349. In politics he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 410)

JOHN C. YOCUM, attorney at law, Catawissa, was born in Roaringcreek Township, Columbia Co., Penn., April 23, 1854, a son of Elijah and Jane (CAMPBELL) YOCUM, natives of Pennsylvania and of German-Scotch descent. His grandfather, Capt. John YOUCUM, came from Germany to America when quite young, and settled in Roaringcreek Township, this county, where he purchased a farm and followed agriculture all his life. He was a good farmer and owned considerable land. He was a very large man and always took great delight in showing his strength, and it is thought his life was shortened by overdoing himself. He died at the age of fifty-two years, in the prime of his life. He was a Democrat politically, which is rather remarkable, as all his children except the father of our subject, who was always a Democrat, are Republicans, and was a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Our subject's father was a farmer and also dealt in lumber. He owned three saw-mills in Locust Township, this county, and started in life with not money enough to buy a team of horses. At the time of his death he owned 1,500 acres of land. He died in 1882, in his sixty-ninth year. He had been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church until the war when, politics being introduced into the pulpit, he became disgusted and withdrew. Our subject was reared on a farm but was engaged in the lumber business with his father until seventeen years of age, when he entered Ebysburg Academy, which he attended four terms. He then entered Lebanon Valley College at Anneville, Penn., where he graduated from the classical department in 1879. Previous to that, however, he had taught four terms of school at intervals during the college course. In 1880 he entered the office of the Hon. Charles R. BUCKALEW at Bloomsburg, with whom he read law two years, and was admitted to the bar in December, 1881. In April, 1882, he came to Catawissa, and has since been practicing law here. Mr. YOCUM is a very able attorney. He married, October 28, 1885, Fannie C., daughter of Jacob S. and Louise KILLINGER, a native of Annville, Lebanan Co., Penn. Mr. YOCUM is a member of the United Brethren Church, and Mrs. YOCUM of the Reformed Church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, No. 349, Catawissa Lodge; in politics a Democrat. Mr. YOCUM is the owner of a tract of land in Locust Township in timber, and the house and lot where he resides. In October, 1884, he and C. E. RANDALL purchased the Catawissa News Item, which is a neat seven-column, four-page sheet, and has a circulation of 1,500. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 410)

DANIEL ZARR, JR., farmer, P. O. Catawissa, was born in Berks County, this State, March 17, 1835, a son of John and Catherine (STINE) ZARR, natives of Pennsylvania and of German descent. His ancestors came from that country and settled in Berks County where they followed farming. His grandfather, George, lived in that county for a number of years, later moved to Columbia County nearly a century ago, bought a farm and built the stone house in the south end of Catawissa, which is now owned by Frank SHUMAN. There were but two or three houses in Catawissa when he moved here. Our subject's father was born in Northampton County, Penn., and came here when a boy, but remained only a short time; then he moved to Berks County, where he remained a few years an, about 1835, returned to Catawissa where he resided until his death which occurred in July, 1881, at the home of his son Daniel. He had been drafted in the service of his country, but the war closed before he was called to the field. He was the father of nine children, six of whom are living: David, John, Benjamin, Joel, Daniel and Jeremiah. Three daughters are dead. Daniel was only a babe when his parents moved here, and he remained at home until he was of age, attending school. He then worked for anybody and everybody in order to support his parents, whom he cared for till their death. In 1881 he bought a farm of eighty-three acres of good land, where he now resides. He is a member of the Lutheran Church, and is an intelligent and enterprising citizen. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887 Catawissa Township pg. 411)

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