COLUMBIA COUNTY, PA BIOGRAPHIES

CENTRE TOWNSHIP

From "The History of Columbia and Mountour Counties"
Battle, 1887


 
LEVI AIKMAN, farmer, P. O. Light Street, was born in what is now Centre Township, this county, on the farm on which he now resides, on March 4, 1816, son of Levi, Sr., and Margaret (HUTCHINSON) AIKMAN, the latter of whom was born in Northampton County, Penn., her father being a farmer: she was reared in Northampton County, and, her parents dying when she was a child, she afterward came to this county. Her ancestors were of Scotch-Irish extraction. The AIKMAN family are also of Scotch-Irish extraction, Alexander AIKMAN having emigrated from the North of Ireland to this country. He came to this country from Morris County, N. J., during the progress of the Revolutionary war, about 1777 or 1778. He had been previously married in New Jersey to Miss Mary LEWIS, and they came to this county with their children, among whom was Levi AIKMAN, Sr., father of the subject of this sketch. With him also came three brothers. He located on a tract of land which he purchased, the land on which Levi now resides being part of his original purchase, although he himself located about a half mile east. There were but few settlers in this vicinity when he came, probably a couple of families, and he found his purchase, which is in the Briar creek valley, covered with a very heavy growth of timber. He commenced by cutting down trees enough to hew out the logs for a cabin in which he could domicile his family, and, this task accomplished, he set about clearing up a farm in the heart of the wilderness. Here there were bears and wolves in large numbers, and Levi AIKMAN, Sr., often related to his family in later days that when he came deer were more plentiful than are sheep at the present day. He became quite expert in deer hunting, and killed quite a number of bears during the time he lived in the county. When Alexander AIKMAN first came out he was accompanied only by his three sons, and after getting his 900 acres located, his cabin built and three acres of turnips planted, he and his sons went back to the neighborhood of Sunbury, Northumberland County, to bring out the remainder of the family who had been temporarily left there. While they were at that place making preparations to return to this locality, the Indian war broke out, rendering it unsafe to venture back to their then western home. So when Alexander AIKMAN received an offer from a man who wished to purchase a part of his land, he sold 600 acres. He afterward often related how the compensation he got for this large tract was realized from the sale of thirty yards of tow cloth, he having been obliged to take his pay in Continental money. They then returned to Morris County, N. J. After the Indian troubles, however, the family came out to this county, and here Alexander and his wife lived until their death. The former died in the latter part of the last century; the latter survived him some time. They are buried in Scott Township, but not in a regular cemetery, as there was none in the county at the time of their death. Of their seven children Levi, Sr., was the second in order of age. Born in New Jersey in 1766, he was but a boy when his parents came to this county, and as he grew up he also witnessed the gradual progress of what is now Columbia County. He made his home with his parents until he was married. He had received some educational instruction in New Jersey, but on coming to this locality the meager educational facilities of that day allowed him but a month or so more of schooling. He spent his boyhood days here at work on his father's farm, and when he was about thirty years of age he was married to Miss Margaret HUTCHINSON. Before his marriage he had bought the land on which his son Levi now resides, and on which he had previously done some work, and after his marriage he and his wife settled on this land. Here he followed farming until about fifteen years before his death, after which time he lived a retired life. They are the parents of eight children, of whom two are living: Levi, subject of this sketch, and James Emmett, born April 19, 1819, and who makes his home with Levi. Those that died were Sarah, wife of George HIDLAY; Esther, wife of Abraham WILLETT; Elizabeth, died at the age of three or four years; Mary, wife of James DEWITT; John WILSON and Margaret. Levi AIKMAN, Sr., died in 1846, being preceded in death by his wife some six or eight years. They are buried at the HIDLAY Union Church. Levi AIKMAN, subject of this sketch, is next to the youngest of their eight children. He was born and reared on the tract of land where he now resides, has always made it his home, and has only removed once, and that time out of an old house into a new one. He was reared to farm life, and received the advantages of the schools of his day. He taught school three terms when a young man, but did not like the occupation, and afterward gave his attention to farming. He was married in Hemlock Township, this county, April 24, 1849, to Miss Elizabeth OHL, a native of Hemlock Township, and a daughter of John and Lena (GIRTON) OHL, the former of whom came whan a boy with his parents to this county from Montgomery County, Penn.; the latter was born in Hemlock Township, but her parents came from New Jersey. The OHLS were originally of German, the GIRTONS of English, lineage. Henry OHL, grandfather of Miss AIKMAN, was a captain in the Revolutionary war. He died at the age of eighty-six years, and is buried in the Lutheran cemetery, in Bloomsburg, as is also his wife. The parents of Mrs. AIKMAN are both deceased, her father dying in 1855, at the age of sixty-three years, eleven months, and her mother in 1869, at the age of seventy years. They are buried in Rosemont Cemetery, Bloomsburg. Mr. and Mrs. AIKMAN are the parents of four children: John Hervey, a graduate of the State Normal School, Bloomsburg, Penn.; Lena Margaret, wife of Arthur C. CREASY of Centre Township, this county; Clara Elizabeth, wife of H. V. WHITE, attorney and grain dealer, of Bloomsburg, Penn., and Mary Alvernon. Mr. and Mrs. AIKMAN are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. AIKMAN was identified in times past with the Whig party, and cast his first vote for Henry Clay. He is now a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 412)

J. E. AIKMAN, retired farmer, P. O. Light Street, was born in what is now Centre Township, this county, April 28, 1819, son of Levi, Sr., and Margaret (HUTCHINSON) AIKMAN, a full sketch of whom appears above. Our subject made his home with his parents until they died, following farming, and helping his father until twenty-one years of age, after which he worked on shares of the place. After the father's death J. E. and Levi, Jr., purchased the old homestead, J. E. buying about 137 acres. He now has 100 acres of fine farm land, among the finest in the valley, and also has thirty acres of timber land. He received his education in the subscription schools of his day, spending about three months in the year in school during the time of his attendance, and the remainder of the year at work on the farm. He is a Republican politically. During the war he was a strong Union man, and contributed largely from his funds toward the Union cause. He is a member of the P. of H. and member of the Presbyterian Church.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 412)

JACOB AUL, farmer, P. O. Lime Ridge, was born in New York City, March 30, 1847, son of Jacob and Catherine (BERGER) AUL. Both parents were natives of Germany, but were married after coming to this country. When Jacob was an infant of four weeks his parents removed to this county and located at Bloomsburg, where the father worked at the Irondale furnace. Both parents died at Bloomsburg; the father in 1854, and the mother about 1877, and are buried in Rosemont Cemetery. Jacob was reared at Bloomsburg till reaching the age of eleven years, when he returned to New York City, and was engaged indifferent occupations, among which were driving express wagon and working in the market, etc. He remained there about six years, and then entered the service of his country, although hardly seventeen years of age. After coming out of the service he went back to New York, and was engaged in the market a short time, and then went to New Market, N. H., where he was engaged in the new Market Cotton Manufacturing Company's employ. He remained there one winter, then returned to New York and remained there about three months; then came back to Bloomsburg. Here he commenced the blacksmith trade with Maurice SLOAN, and remained with him and Stephen KNOW, while learning his trade, about two years, one year with each. Having finished his apprenticeship he was employed in the tunnel at Oxford, N. J., on the D. L. & W. Ry., throughout its construction, and after that returned to the blacksmith trade at Bloomsburg. He remained there one summer and then again went to New York, where he enlisted in the regular army in Company A, Fourth United States Cavalry, and from there went to Carlisle, where he stayed two weeks; then to St. Louis; was there one year; then to Jacksboro, Tex., and was there six or eight months; thence to McKavitt, and there he was transferred to Company G; was there five or six months, then went to Curryville, Tex., and after a short time was ordered back to Fort Clark; and after a time marched to Texas and to the Cheyenne Agency, Indian Territory, at which place he was discharged. During the time of his service he was engaged in Indian fighting, and was in one regular engagement on Mexican soil. After his discharge he came back to Bloomsburg, and made that city his home until coming to his present location, which he bought and moved on in 1884. During his last residence in Bloomsburg, however, he traveled a great deal, "taking in," among other places, the Centennial at Philadelphia. He was married at Bloomsburg in September, 1877, to Miss Catherine TRAUB, a native of this county, and daughter of Jacob TRAUB. Her parents are both deceased and are buried at Numidia, this county. Mr. and Mrs. AUL are the parents of five children, of whom four are living: George E., Mabel Alice, Harry and Bruce Raymond. Mary is deceased. Mr. AUL is a Democrat, politically. As previously stated, he enlisted in the Union Army when not seventeen years of age. That was August 11, 1863, in Company H, Tenth New Hampshire Volunteers. He was in the Army of the Potomac under Butler, and was in engagements at Cold Harbor, and participated in the hot work and all the principal engagements in the vicinity of Petersburg and Richmond, and surrender of Lee. He remained in the service till the close of the war, was discharged at the Point of Rocks, and returned to New York. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 413)

H. C. BARTON, farmer, P. O. Lime Ridge, was born at Epsy,[sic] this county, January 10, 1832, son of Cyrus and Catherine (BREWER) BARTON. Elisha BARTON, grandfather of our subject, was born in Virginia, June 21, 1742, and was a son of Thomas BARTON, a native of England. Elisha BARTON came into Pennsylvania and located finally in what is now Hemlock Township, Columbia County, close to McKELVY's mill. He bought a very large tract of land which was of considerable width, and extended in length from Fishing creek to the vicinity of Buckhorn, a distance of between three and four miles. This land was, at the time he acquired possession, covered with a heavy growth of timber, and he set about clearing up a portion of it, and on this cleared land he carried on agriculture. The maiden name of his wife was Anna McCARTER, born in New Jersey, March 20, 1754. They reared a large family, but none of their children now survive. On this land Elisha BARTON and his wife lived until death. They are buried in the old Episcopal graveyard at Bloomsburg. A portion of this large tract of land was afterward discovered to be very valuable ore land, and one of his sons, Caleb, afterward became wealthy from the proceeds of this land, having an income of between $4,000 and $5,000 per year from that source. Cyrus BARTON, father of H. C., was born at the old homestead of his father, where he was reared. He made his home with his father until arriving at age, assisting his father a portion of the time on the farm. When he came to Bloomsburg there was but a cluster of houses there, none of its industries having been then developed, and he and his brother John entered mercantile business, being among the early merchants of the place. There they remained in business until about 1828 or 1829, when Cyrus removed to Espy, and commenced keeping store in a building which had been put up by one Henry EDGAR for a residence. In a portion of this Mr. BARTON kept his store, and in the remainder he and his family lived. He was the first merchant in Espy, and he ranked among her business men until about 1860, when he sold out his stock and retired from active business. He died there about three years later and is buried at Afton. His widow still resides at Espy in the same house the family lived in so long. They were the parents of nine children, of whom seven are living: Anna Eliza, wife of Jacob ADAMS, a minister of the Methodist denomination at Delaware, Ohio; H. c.; John A., cashier of Pardee & Co., at Hazleton, Penn. (he has held that position for over twenty years); Mary Alice, who resides with her mother at Espy; William A., bookkeeper at Hazleton, Penn.; Charles Frank, residing at Buffalo, N. Y., where he is bookkeeper for a large milling concern; and Florence, wife of William INGLEHART, an extensive miller, of Evansville, Ind. H. C. Barton, subject of this sketch, made his home with his parents until he was eighteen years of age, engaged principally in clerking in his father's store. He attended the schools of Espy, and when sufficiently advanced, went to the Wyoming Seminary, at Kingston, which he attended about one year. On arriving at the age of eighteen he went to Scranton, Penn., and sold goods for a merchant named THOMPSON for about six months; then engaged with the SCRANTONS, with whom he remained about two years selling goods. One year he sold $50,000 worth of goods behind the retail counter, an extraordinary amount for one clerk. After leaving their employ he entered the service of wells & Co., who were then engaged in an extensive contract on the construction of the Lackawanna Railroad. While with them he clerked in their store, assisting on their book, etc., and was in their employ one year. He then returned to this county. While with his last employers he was appointed postmaster at Stanhope, a position he held until returning to his native county. At this time he embarked in mercantile business at Lime Ridge, and so continued about one year. Then in 1856 he moved to Espy, where he spent a portion of the summer, and then went back to Scranton and engaged in mercantile business in partnership with one HAWLEY. This business continued until the spring of 1858, when our subject again entered, along with his brother-in-law, E. W. M. LOW, into mercantile business. This partnership continued until the spring of 1860, when he removed onto the farm then belonging to the heirs of Isaac LOW, his wife being one of the heirs. At a sale afterward he became the purchaser and owner. In 1866 he went to Williamsport, where he was engaged in contracting and building, and afterward in the manufacture of axes, continuing in that until the spring of 1871, when he moved back to their farm in Centre Township, on which he has since resided. He was married in the house in which he now resides while a resident of Scranton, May 8, 1856, to Miss Mary Frances LOW, a native of what is now Centre Township, this county, born in the house where she now resides, a daughter of Isaac and Maria LOW. Mr. and Mrs. BARTON are the parents of two children: Laura and Edith, the latter a stenographer at Dansville, N. Y. Both were educated at the State Normal School at Bloomsburg. Mr. BARTON is a member of Centre Grange, No. 56, P. of H. He was its first secretary, a position he held for about three years: has been Master of the Grange and is now filling the position of lecturer for the local Grange. He is a trustee of Lime Ridge Methodist Episcopal Church, of which denomination Mr. and Mrs. BARTON are members. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 414)

N. L. CAMPBELL, retired farmer, P. O. Espy, was born in Warren County, N. J., March 10, 1825, son of Richard and Mary C. (LANNING) CAMPBELL. Daniel CAMPBELL, grandfather of our subject, was born in New Jersey, of Scotch descent, his parents having come directly from Scotland to New Jersey. He was married to Rachel HOWE, in New Jersey, and in that State they remained until coming to Northumberland County, Penn., where they died. Daniel belonged to a uniformed company of light infantry in the Continental service, and served seven years in the colonial forces throughout the Revolutionary war immediately under Washington, and participated in the engagements at Bunker Hill and Brandywine; was also at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. Although he went through that terrible winter at Valley Forge, he came through his seven years of service without having been on the sick list a single day, and was never wounded, although his military hat, which was kept in the family for a number of years after independence was gained, showed seven bullet holes in it, as mementos of the struggle. He was a man of iron constitution, and considerably above the average in height, standing six feet two inches in his stockings. When he came to Northumberland County he located in what is called the Irish Valley, and took 1,500 acres of land, several of his sons locating around him. These sons were John, Robert, William, Benjamin and Daniel. His sons, Elijah, Jarred and Theodore, also located there, but when Richard, the father of N. L., came to that locality, these three had removed to Ohio. George CAMPBELL, another son, was the only one of the family who came immediately to what is now Columbia County. He located at Berwick when there was only a cluster of houses to mark the spot where that flourishing borough now stands. He lived there until he died, carrying on the tailoring business. Daniel CAMPBELL, grandfather of N. L., died at his Northumberland County residence in 1834, at the age of ninety-six years. His wife had preceded him in death by a number of years. They are buried in the Warrior Run Cemetery. Part of the land which Daniel took up is now used by the Treverton Coal Company, which does an extensive mining business. Richard CAMPBELL, father of N. L., was born in New Jersey, and there grew up and was married to Miss Mary C. LANNING. Possessing the military spirit of his father he went out in the war of 1812, through which he served, and on returning he remained at home until 1817, when the Indian troubles breaking out afresh, he again offered his services, and remained out until quiet was restored. He traveled about considerably in his early life, and was thirty-seven years of age when he settled down and married. In 1832, he and his family removed to Northumberland County, and from there they came to Madison Township, this county, thence to Hemlock Township, and thence to Centre Township, where they died while making their home with their son, N. L. The mother died October 31, 1855, the father one month later. They are buried in Rosemont Cemetery at Bloomsburg. They were the parents of six children, of whom four are now living: Rachel, wife of Evanuel HOUPT, in Johnson City, Tenn.; N. L.; James I., living near Orangeville, this county; Andrew Jackson, living at Danville, this county. The deceased are Mehitable Ann, wife of Joseph HUNTER, died in Danville, and Sarah Elizabeth, who was unmarried. Our subject was seven years of age when his parents removed to Northumberland County, Penn., and two years later they came to this county, where he was reared to manhood. He made his home with his parents until he was married, and then located at his present residence in Centre Township. He was married, February 21, 1849, to Miss Sarah WEBB, a daughter of Samuel and Mary WEBB, both natives of this county, whose parents came here from one of the lower counties in Pennsylvania at a day when it was necessary to go to Northumberland County to mill. Both the parents and grandparents of Mrs. CAMPBELL died in this county, and are all buried in Briarcreek Union Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. CAMPBELL were the parents of three children: David W., married to Miss Martha BITTENBENDER (they live in this township); Elmira Jane, wife of C. W. WALKER (they live in Atchinson, Kas.), and an infant (deceased). Mrs. CAMPBELL died in the latter part of December 1854, and is buried in the Bloomsburg Cemetery. Mr. CAMPBELL then married, in 1856, Miss Eleanor N. MCVICKER, a native of this county, and daughter of James and Sarah MCVICKER. She died in 1866. In 1868 Mr. CAMPBELL was married to Isabella ROBINSON, a native of this county, who died in 1872. By this marriage there were three children, of whom one is living--Arlo Vistus. The deceased were infants unnamed. Mr. CAMPBELL is a member of the Presbyterian Church at Bloomsburg. He has sixty-three acres of land in this township, and thirty-two in Hemlock Township, this county. Mr. CAMPBELL has been connected with the schools of Centre Township as director. He is a member of the P. of H., and was the organizer of Centre Grange, No. 56, serving as Master of the Grange for three years, the first one to hold this position. He afterward served two terms as lecturer for the Grange. Mr. CAMPBELL's last wife acted as volunteer nurse through the civil war in Mrs. BIGELOW's corps. She was an eminently Christian woman, an affectinate wife, a kind mother and a warm friend until death. Her remains are buried in Rosemont Cemetery, at Bloomsburg. Our subject says he "was an active supporter of his Government during the late Rebellion; was twice summoned to Harrisburg as witness on the trial of one who was reported leader of what was then called the Fishingcreek confederacy. The rebutting testimony on that trial, which is now a matter of history, is so wide of the truth and so improbable under the circumstances, the idea of an unarmed man going into a neighborhood--where it was reported and confidently believed at the time that there were 500 armed men to resist the draft and prohibit the enlisting of men for the service--and entering into a quarrel with a reputed leader and in the presence of four bar-room loungers and communicating his business, is so highly improbable, that he never intended to treat the matter with any other than silent contempt, as no one but an idiot would ever believe the statement unless he believed he (our subject) possessed more courage than the combined Fishingcreek confederacy." (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 414-15)

PHILIP CREASY, farmer, P. O. Lime Ridge, was born in Mifflin Township, this county, July 30, 1826; son of John and Margaret (DEITRICH) CREASY. Philip CREASY, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was born in one of the lower counties of Pennsylvania, and from there came to what is now Columbia County, when a young man, and located in Mifflin Township, where Philip CREASY now resides. He was a farmer by occupation, but game being plentiful when he came, he indulged a great deal in hunting. He was married in this county to a Miss BAUMAN, and they lived on that place until their death. He cleared up the land on the place where he located, all of it being then covered with heavy growth of timber. He and his wife are both buried on the old homestead. John CREASY, father of the subject of this sketch, was born and reared on the old homestead of his father, and worked with the latter until his marriage. He then bought land in the vicinity of his father's home, part of which had been previously cleared, and on which there were some building improvements. He afterward sold that place, about 1839, and bought a farm in what is now Centre Township, to which he removed. That tract is now the farms of Philip, Elias and Lafayette. He found about half of it cleared, and he and his boys cleared up the remainder. He died while living on this place. He was married in this county to Miss Margaret DIETRICH. Her parents were also early settlers, having come from one of the lower counties. Mr. and Mrs. John CREASY were the parents of eleven children, of whom eight are now living; Elias, in Centre Township, this county; Eve, wife of Daniel HESS in Mifflin County; Jacob and Philip, twins, the former in Virginia; Lafayette, also in Centre Township; Caleb, in Mifflinville, this county; John, in Fishingcreek Township, this county, and Stephen in Garfield County, Iowa. John CREASY, father of the above, died in 1845; his widow survived him until 1872. The former is buried at CREASY Cemetery in Mifflin Township, the latter at the Brick Church, Briarcreek Township, this county. Philip CREASY, subject of this sketch, was but a boy when his parents removed to Centre Township, and here was reared to manhood. He made his home with his father until the latter's death, and continued to live on the homestead until he built his present large brick residence in 1872. He was married in this county about 1851, to Miss Mary Rachel HAGENBUCH, a native of this township, daughter of Daniel and Elizabeth (HILL) HAGENBUCH. Mr. and Mrs. CREASY are the parents of seven children: Arthur Clarence, married to Miss Margaret AIKMAN (they reside in this township); John Daniel, married to Miss Alice REEDY (they live in Nescopeck, Penn.); Elizabeth, wife of T. D. STRAUSS (they live at Lime Ridge, Penn.); Verna, Charles, Wilson and Frank. Mr. and Mrs. CREASY are members of the New School Lutheran Church. He has held local township offices, having been school director, overseer of the poor, supervisor, etc. He is a member of the Grange Association. John CREASY, father of Philip, started west about two years before coming to Centre Township. Taking two horses and a truck wagon he and his wife teamed it through as far as Kalamazoo, Mich., through a country, much of which was then inhabited by Indians, camping out at night. He went out merely on a visit, and would probably have stayed if the locality had suited him. He could then have bought all the good land he wanted there for 10 shillings per acre, but it did not suit him, and he returned by the same means as he had gone. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 415)

SAMUEL CREVELING, farmer, farmer, P. O. Light Street, was born in what is now Centre Township, this county, September 30, 1830, a son of Alexander and Rebecca (MARR) CREVELING. Andrew CREVELING, grandfather of Samuel, came to what is now Columbia County from the State of new Jersey, and located near what is now Espytown, in Scott Township, where he bought land and made improvements after the fashion of that day. At that time, and four years, there were no milling facilities closer than Sunbury, and he used to send his boys down to Sunbury with wheat to be ground; they generally loaded about fifteen bushels of grain on a canoe, "poling" to Sunbury and return. He was married in New Jersey before coming to this county, and, on location in what is now Scott Township, they made their home in that vicinity until they died. Of their children all are deceased. Alexander CREVELING, son of the above, and father of Samuel, was born in what is now Columbia County, Penn., and was reared to farm life. This he followed alone until 1850, when he built the tannery now owned by Jacob RINK, in Centre Township. He had bought land, on part of which the tannery is located, in the early part of the present century, and after putting up the tannery, he managed that business and carried on farming until his death. He was married in this county to Miss Rebecca MARR, a native of this county and daughter of Lawrence MARR. Her parents came to this county from Scotland, located near Easton, Penn., and from there removed to this county, where both died and are buried in Hidlay Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander CREVELING were the parents of sixteen children, of whom three are living: Cyrus, in Buffalo Valley, Union Co., Penn.; Samuel, and Franklin, in Centre Township, this county. Alexander CREVELING died August 10, 1857; his wife in January, 1883. They are buried in Hidlay Cemetery. At the time of his death Mr. CREVELING was the owner of 187 acres of land and the tanner property. Samuel CREVELING, subject of this sketch, was born and reared at the place where he now resides. When a boy he principally assisted his father in the farm work, but worked occasionally in the tannery, especially in winter, and in about 1849-50 he used to haul hides in the winter season from Scranton, Pittston, Wilkesbarre and other places depended on the tannery. Scranton at that time contained but a few houses, and gave his attention entirely to farming. He was married in this county September 24, 1857, to Miss Mary Ann LAMON, a native of this county and daughter of James and Hannah (SPEAR) LAMON, natives of Ireland, who on coming to this country first located near Mauch Chunk; from there they removed to Briarcreek Township, this county, and there they lived until their death; the former died in 1872 and the latter in the fall of 1878, and are buried at Berwick, this county. Mr. and Mrs. CREVELING were the parents of nine children, of whom six are living: Hiram Jasper, married to Miss Sarah MELICK, living at Pittston, Penn.; Marietta, wife of Elmer CREVELING, living near Espytown, this county; Ella, Willbert G., Clarence Alexander and Grace Edna, Annie Irene, Jennie Eudella and Charles Wesley are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. CREVELING are members of the Methodist Church. He has 177 acres of land. The place on which his home is located is a part of the first tract taken up between the mouths of Fishing creek and East Briarcreek, the original grant, still in Mr. CREVELING's possession, bearing the name and seal of William Penn, and bearing the date of 1869. The CREVELING family were great hunters and rifle shots, and some of them were very expert at the latter act. The father of Samuel killed two bears in the vicinity of the latter's home. He, like the other men of the family, was a fine shot. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 416)

JOHN C. CRYDER, farmer, P. O. Willow Spring, was born in Briarcreek Township, this county, March, 1, 1860, son of Isaac L. and Mary (HICKS) CRYDER. Thomas S. CRYDER, grandfather of John C., removed from Philadelphia to this county in the early part of the present century, coming with his mother and sisters. He had been a carpenter in Philadelphia, an occupation he followed to some extent after coming to this country. He died March 16, 1878, his wife having preceded him in death by a number of years, and was buried in Philadelphia. He (Thomas S. CRYDER) was buried in Berwick, Penn. Isaac L. CRYDER, father of John C., was born in Philadelphia in August, 1834, and was reared to farm life. He bought a farm of 100 acres in Briarcreek Township, on which he located, and in November, 1867, removed to the Briarcreek grocery, which he conducted for eighteen months. In 1869 he bought the farm where his son L. H. now resides in Centre Township, and there he lived and died. He was married in this county to Miss Mary HICKS, February 18, 1858, and they were the parents of three children, two of whom are living: John C. and Leoni H. Edwin A. is deceased. The father of the family died May 5, 1877, and is buried at Berwick, this county. His widow resides with her son, Leoni H. John C. CRYDER, the subject of this sketch, was reared in Briarcreek Township to farm life, attending the schools of Briarcreek and Centre Townships, and the State normal at Bloomsburg, where he remained about two years taking the classical course. He was married in this county February 17, 1885, to Cora A. CREVELING, a member of an early settler's family of the county, and they are the parents of one child, Harold Creveling CRYDER. Mr. CRYDER and his brother, Leoni H., have 142 acres of land in this township. Leoni H. CRYDER was born in Briarcreek Township, this county, August 5, 1865, and was reared in Briarcreek and Centre Townships. He makes his home in Centre Township, he and his mother living together. He received his education in the schools of Centre Township, attending also two terms at the State normal at Bloomsburg. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 417)

Z. T. FOWLER, dealer in grain and coal, etc., Willow Springs, was born in what is now Centre Township, this county, September 30, 1848, son of Gilbert H. and Catherine (SMITH) FOWLER. Benjamin FOWLER, grandfather of Z. T., came to what is now Columbia County from Reading, shortly after the close of the Revolutionary war. He was born in England, and when seventeen years of age came to America, and, being a Briton by birth, he naturally drifted into the British army, and was engaged in that war entirely through that struggle, participating in all of the battles in which his regiment was engaged, being with the army at the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown. After the war he went into the Wyoming Valley with a number of others, but those of the class to which he belonged did not affiliate in friendship with the Pennamites, or French and Indian classes, and the latter having the odds in numerical strength, Mr. FOWLER and his friends, for their own safety, took their departure from the valley by way of New York State. From there they went to Reading, but being determined to locate farther up and along the Susquehanna River, he came to what is now Columbia County on a pack horse, and took up land--the home farm of Lafayette CREASY being part of the tract settled on. He found this land covered with scrub oak and hazel brush, and he settled about putting up a shanty for his own occupancy, but about the time he got started clearing up the place he was driven off by the Indians. He went back to Reading, and while there was married to Miss Catherine FOWLER, who had previously lived in this vicinity. They packed provisions enough to last them a year, corn and rye being the principal staples, transporting them to their new home by packs. Arriving here they located on land which S. H. SWANK now owns and lives on, and there Mr. FOWLER built a log house. He had put out a small crop of corn and rye at his previous location, and when it was ripe he went up there and gathered the crops. There were two or three other families living within a radius of a few miles when they came, and when they found there was a new family among them, they being almost destitute, came and borrowed corn meal and other supplies which had been brought by Mr. FOWLER, until nearly all his supplies were gone, and for four months, on account of their generosity, the only food they had besides wild game was dried apples and milk. At this location both Benjamin FOWLER and his wife lived until they died. They are buried at the Stone Church, in Briarcreek Township, this county. Gilbert H., the youngest of their nine children, was born in the log house erected by his father, and here he was reared to manhood. He lived on that place until his death. He and his brother William purchased their father's farm of about 100 acres during the hard times of 1836. Gilbert H. was twice married. His first wife was Miss MACK, and by her he had ten children, the following named now living: M. P., at Shenandoah, Penn.; Charles S., at Scranton, Penn.; A. P., also at Scranton; John W., in Lehigh County, Penn.; Jane, wife of J. R. MILLARD, in Dunlap, Kan. The deceased are Sallie Ann, wife of Samuel BITTENBENDER (he now lives in Kansas); Lydia, wife of J. P. CONNER (both were drowned in the canal April 8, 1878), and three who died in infancy. Mr. FOWLER's second wife was a Miss Catherine SMITH, born in Mifflin Township, this county, and by her he had four children, following named now living: S. S., living in Elizabeth City, N. C., where he is engaged in the dry goods and notion business, and also carries on the manufacture of cotton, he having established one of the first cotton factories in the South after the war; Elmira, wife of Samuel J. CONNER, living in Briarcreek Township, this county, and Z. T. Clemuel L. died at the age of four years. Gilbert H. FOWLER died March 24, 1873, at Elizabeth City, N. C., where he had been spending the winter on account of his health, and is buried in the Berwick Cemetery. Z. T. FOWLER, subject of this sketch, received his early education in the common schools of his neighborhood, and afterward attended Williamsport Seminary. After returning from school he became engaged in general merchandising and farming in connection with his brother, S. S. After four years the latter went South, and Mr. FOWLER's father took his interest; but after one year he retired from the farm, and Z. T. carried on the business for three years alone. He then sold out his store, and bought a farm of twelve acres and residence at Willow Grove Station, since which time, 1875, he has carried on the coal and grain business there. He also has charge of the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western R. R. office at this point. He was appointed postmaster there when he came, which position he has since held. He was married in this county November 17, 1868, to Miss Jennie S. WATTS, a native of Luzerne County, Penn., and a daughter of John W. and Julia WATTS (both deceased), the former born in Juniata County, the latter near Plymouth, Luzerne Co., Penn. Mr. and Mrs. FOWLER are the parents of three children, two of whom died in their infancy. Dayton WATTS is the name of their living child. Mr. and Mrs. FOWLER are members of the Methodist Church. He is a Republican, politically. He was postmaster at Fowlerville for four years, succeeding his father, who had held the office from the time of Lincoln's first election. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 417-18)

WESLEY B. FREAS, farmer, P. O. Fowlersville, was born in Briarcreek Township, this county, April 10, 1813, son of Philip and Sarah (FOWLER) FREAS. John FREAS, grandfather of Wesley B., was born in Mount Bethel, Lehigh Co., Penn., and was there reared to farm life. He was there married to Miss Dorcas HOFFMAN, and they moved from Mount Bethel to what is now Columbia County, about 1795, and located on land which now belongs to Levi GANETT, in Briarcreek Township. He bought a small piece of rather rough land there, which he found covered with a heavy growth of timber. They had come up by wagon, and while Mr. FREAS was engaged in putting up his cabin, the family lived in their wagon. He cleared up a space sufficient to place his buildings on, and with the timber thus cut down, he put up his rude log cabin. At one end of his cabin he erected a shed, in which to keep his cow. After getting up his cabin he cleared up a small piece more, and put out a small crop of rye. thus things went on until he had cleared up a good portion of this land, each year putting out a little larger crop. Game of all kinds was abundant. The Indians were yet numerous, and when trouble was expected, the family were in the habit of retiring to Fort Jenkins until such excitement would calm down. He lived at this place a number of years, and when he left it and moved to a farm he had bought in what is now Centre Township (now owned by M. W. JACKSON) his family was all grown up. There he remained the remainder of his lifetime, and when he died at the age of eighty-four years, about 1839, he was quite well off. His widow survived him some five or six years. They are buried at the Stone Church, Briarcreek Township, this county. Of their twelve children, Philip, father of our subject, was the second in order of birth. He was born in Mount Bethel, Penn., and when the family removed to what is now Columbia County, he was about ten years of age. He made his home with his parents until he was married, and after that removed to the place which his father had bought, now known as the M. W. JACKSON farm. There he lived only about eight years, and then bought a farm which Jesse FREAS now owns, also in Centre Township, and there he lived until his death. He was married to Miss Sarah FOWLER, a native of this county and daughter of Benjamin FOWLER, and they were the parents of eleven children, of whom six are living: Wesley B.; Rebecca, wife of Paul ZANER, living in this township; Martha, widow of Abraham HARTMAN; Minerva, wife of Stephen HUTTEN, living in Orangeville, this county; Jesse, also living in Orangeville; Berch, living in Bloomsburg, this county. The father of this family died in about 1865; his widow survived him by about six years. They are buried at the Stone Church, Briarcreek Township, this county. Wesley B. FREAS, subject of this sketch, was reared in this county, and made his home with his parents until he was married, when he removed to part of the land which he now owns, and lived there until removing to his present location, in 1869. He was married in this county on March 23, 1858, to Miss Hannah RITTENHOUSE, a native of this county, and daughter of Henry and Rachel (HUTTEN) RITTENHOUSE, both natives of this county, where they lived and died. Both are buried in the Berwick Cemetery. The RITTENHOUSE and HUTTEN families were both early settlers, and figured in many of the early events. Mr. and Mrs. FREAS are the parents of one child--Bruce B., who was educated in the schools of his township and at Orangeville. Mrs. FREAS and her son are members of the Methodist Church. Mr. FREAS is a member of Briarcreek Grange, P. of H., of which he has held the office of treasurer. He was commissioned by Gov. David R. PORTER, May 15, 1839, second lieutenant of the Briarcreek Riflemen, attached to the volunteer brigade of the Columbia Guards, in the Second Brigade of the Eighth Division, Pennsylvania Militia, composed of the counties of Northumberland, Union, Columbia, Luzerne, Susquehanna and Wayne, and held the position until 1842, when he was commissioned captain of the Briarcreek Volunteer Rifles, Second Regiment, Second Brigade, Eighth Division Militia for the same counties, and served a term of four years. He is a Democrat politically. He wons altogether 185 acres of land in two farms. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 418)

FREDERICK HAGENBUCH, farmer, P. O. Espy, was born in Centre Township, this county, May 27, 1827, a son of Daniel and Elizabeth (HILL) HAGENBUCH. John HAGENBUCH, grandfather of subject, was born in Northampton County, Penn., but when a young man his parents removed to this county and located where F. H. HAGENBUCH now resides just east of the Hidlay Church. There they lived all their lives, following farming. They are buried in the Hidlay Cemetery. John HAGENBUCH was married while in Northampton County to a Miss DREISBACH, and they were the parents of eight sons, all of whom are deceased. Their names were Conrad, who resided where Mrs. Simon FRY now lives (he afterward moved to the West branch, and there resided until his death); Simon lived near Summer Hill, in Centre Township; John lived where A. C. HAGENBUCH now resides; Jacob lived adjoining, where J. S. HAGENBUCH now resides; Michael lived where Joseph HESS now resides; Daniel, who lived where F. H. HAGENBUCH now resides; Junius, who lived where Jacob AUL now resides, and Charles, a blacksmith by trade, who lived between the residences of Junius and Michael. John HAGENBUCH, father of the foregoing family, bought 400 acres of land from a man named SMITH, which he set about clearing, and, as his boys grew to manhood and set up in business for themselves, he erected buildings for them on this tract. In this way Conrad set up in weaving after learning the trade, and had about thirty-five acres to start with; Simon engaged in farming and freighting to and from Philadelphia; he had sixty-three acres; John, also a farmer, began with fifty-seven acres and later bought out Conrad; Jacob, a wheelwright and colorer, started with about thirty acres; Michael, a wheelwright, had seventeen acres to begin life, also a timber lot; Daniel, a farmer, had sixty-three acres when he started, and afterward bought out Simon and Charles; Junius, a weaver, began with about twenty acres; Charles, a blacksmith, started with twenty acres, and afterward sold out to Daniel, moved to Northumberland county, and died near the Sinking Springs. John HAGENBUCH followed farming until about twenty-five years before his death, when he led a retired life, and his place was farmed by Daniel and Jacob. John HAGENBUCH died about 1845, his first wife, the mother of the sons mentioned above, having preceded him by a number of years. Daniel HAGENBUCH, father of Frederick, and the sixth in order of age of John's eight sons, after his father had retired, still remained with him and divided the large farm among John's eight sons; built a little house on one part of the place near a flowing spring, and John lived there until death, each one of his sons paying him a sort of dowry, or contributing to his support. So that, although the land that Daniel held was his own, it was still subject to this dower right, and Daniel contributed to his father's support. Daniel grew up and married Elizabeth HILL, a native of what is now Columbia County, and daughter of Frederick HILL. Her parents came to this county from Berks County, and here lived all their days. They are buried in the old Hill homestead. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel HAGENBUCH were the parents of seven children, of whom six are living: Frederick; Rachel, wife of Philip CREASY; Wilson, in Atlissa, Muscatine Co., Iowa; Sarah, wife of Manuel KELCHNER, of Bloomsburg, this county; F. H., living on the old homestead of Daniel and John HAGENBUCH, grandfather and father; Hester, wife of T. W. HAGENBUCH, lives on the old HILL homestead; Josiah died at the age of thirty-three years, in April, 1861. Daniel HAGENBUCH followed farming actively until the last few years of his life, after which he lived retired. He died in April, 1878; his wife died in May, 1867, and they are buried in Hidlay Cemetery. Frederick (our subject) lived with his parents until he was twenty-seven years of age, engaged in farming. He then married and rented land from his father-in-law for two years, when he purchased his present home farm in partnership with his father, locating on this place in 1855. He at once began to make improvements on the place, replacing the tumble down buildings by handsome and substantial ones. He also bought the place which he had first rented, and now owns 254 acres of farm land and sixteen acres of timber in Orange Township, this county. He married, February 22, 1853, Miss Margaret HIDLAY, a native of Centre Township, this county, and a daughter of George and Sarah (AIKMAN) HIDLAY. Her parents came to this county from New Jersey and settled where Arthur SPEAR now resides, and there lived until their death. They are buried in Hidlay Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. HAGENBUCH are the parents of five children: George M., married to Mary PURCELL, resides near his father; Oscar D. married Ella MCHENRY, and lives at Stillwater; Ida E., Clara E. and Sadie M. The family are members of the Lutheran Church. Mr. HAGENBUCH has held the offices of school director and supervisor in the township. He is a member of Washington Lodge, A. F. & A. M., at Bloomsburg; is also a member of the Grange, and has held offices in both. Mr. and Mrs. HAGENBUCH are both members of early families. The first grant to the home farm now owned by Mr. HAGENBUCH was made to Henry OWEN, who sold to John BITTENBENDER, and he to Enos FOWLER and S. H. FOWLER, and in 1855 Mr. HAGENBUCH and his father bought it. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 419)

ELISHA HAGENBUCH, farmer, P. O. Light Street, was born in Centre Township, this county, June 7, 1833, son of Jeremiah and Sarah (FULMER) HAGENBUCH. Jacob HAGENBUCH, grandfather of Elisha, was born in this county, his parents having come here at an early day. His father bought a tract of land near where Elisha now resides. He found the land he had purchased mostly covered with a heavy growth of timber, and he set about clearing enough to put up log buildings, using the timber cut down in the construction of his cabin, etc. He followed farming until his death, which occurred about 1845. He and wife are buried in Hidlay Cemetery. Jacob HAGENBUCH, grandfather of Elisha, was born and reared in this county, and learned the trade of wagon-making, and dyeing at different times. When he became of age his father gave him, as he did other members of the family, seventeen acres of land, and on this he cut logs and put up buildings for himself. Some idea of the density of the timber at that time may be gathered from the fact that he had to clear the land in order to dig a well. Although he had a very little land to start with, every time he got $5 or $10 ahead he would buy two or three acres of land to add to his farm, until he finally had 106 acres, and every time he added to his land he would increase the size of his barn, or put a shed on the edge of it, until these sheds entirely surrounded his barn, and he then tore down the whole building and erected a new one. He was married in this county to Miss Abalona HAYMAN, a native of this county, whose parents were also early settlers. He followed farming steadily until the last year or two of his life, when he gradually lessened his labors. He died about 1861, his wife having preceded him some five or six years. They are both buried in Hidlay Cemetery. They left one child, Jeremiah, who was reared while this vicinity was yet young, and amid the scenes generally attending the clearing up of a primitive country. He lived on his parents' place until both of them had been called away, and in the last years of his father's life he farmed the latter's place. He was married in this county to Miss Sarah FULMER, a native of the county. Her parents were born in Columbia County, and removed to Clarion County, Penn., where they both died. Mr. and Mrs. Jeremiah HAGENBUCH were the parents of six children of whom two died in infancy. Those living are Elisha, Margaret E. (wife of A. C. HAGENBUCH); Jacob Sanderson, in this township, and F. P., who also lives in this township. Jeremiah HAGENBUCH died February 20, 1883, and is buried in Hidlay Cemetery. His widow lives at the place where her husband resided at the time of his death. Elisha HAGENBUCH, subject of this sketch, was reared in Centre Township, and made his home with his parents until he was married, which event took place in January, 1862. His wife's maiden name was Delila CREVELING. She was born in Scott Township, this county, and is a daughter of Andrew and Anna CREVELING. Her father died September 1, 1886, in the eighty-second year of his age, having been preceded by his wife by about twenty-four years. Mr. and Mrs. HAGENBUCH are the parents of two children: Anna B. and Sadie. Mr. and Mrs. HAGENBUCH are members of the Lutheran Church. He was school director of Centre Township for nine years; also a member of the Grange. He has 127 acres of land in Centre Township. When Jeremiah HAGENVUCH died he did not only the farm his father left him, but also two others, making in all 390 acres of first-class land, for some of which he paid as high as $117 per acre.(History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 419)

F. P. HAGENBUCH, farmer, P. O. Light Street, was born in Centre Township, this county, December 11, 1852, son of Jeremiah and Sarah (FULMER) HAGENBUCH. Jacob HAGENBUCH, grandfather of F. P., came to this county from one of the lower counties, and located where J. S. HAGENBUCH now resides, in Centre Township, and bought a tract of land there. He came up alone and cleared up enough of the land on which to put up a cabin, using the timber cut down in the erection of a building. At that time the vicinity was very wild, and the land he bought was covered with a heavy growth of timber. In after years he often related how he could have just as well located on more open land up near Berwick, but instead, liked most of the settlers of that day, he chose the heavy timber land, all of which had to be cut down and carried off before the land was fit for farming. He has also related how they used to put bells on their horses and turned them loose, and in the morning they would find them on Summer Hill or beyond. In early life he was a wagon-maker, which he afterward abandoned and gave his attention to farming. He was married in this county to Miss Abalona HAYMAN. Both are deceased and are buried in Hidlay Cemetery. Jeremiah HAGENBUCH, father of F. P., was their only child. He made his home with his parents until death called both of them away, and after that lived on the old homestead until about 1875, when he removed onto another place which he had previously bought, and resided until his death. He was married in this county to Miss Sarah FULMER, a native of Berks County, Penn. They were the parents of six children, two of whom died in infancy. Those living are Elisha, in Centre Township, this county; Margaret Alice, wife of A. C. HAGENBUCH, also in Centre Township, and F. P., subject of this sketch. Jeremiah HAGENBUCH died in 1884, and is buried in Hidlay Cemetery. Our subject was reared in this township, and made his home with his parents until his marriage, working with his father on the farm, and receiving his education in the Hidlay school in the neighborhood of his home. After his marriage he bought his present home and residence, consisting of 115 acres of land, and here he has since resided. He was married in June, 1878, to Miss Emma M. MILLER, a native of this county, and daughter of George P. and Anna MILER, the former of whom is deceased and is buried in Hidlay Cemetery; the latter lives in Centre Township, this county. Mrs. HAGENBUCH, mother of F. P., is still a resident of this township, living at the place where her husband died. Mrs. HAGENBUCH is a member of the Lutheran Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 420)

JESSE HOFFMAN, farmer, P. O. Espy, was born in Centre Township, this county, January 1, 1830, son of William and Annie (DIETRICH) HOFFMAN. Philip HOFFMAN, great-grandfather of our subject, came to this county from the vicinity of Bethlehem, Penn., in the early days of the county, and located in what is now Centre Township, near Fowlersville. He was a farmer by occupation, and when he came here he found this country a wilderness, and had to clear up all the land he had for agricultural purposes. He was in the Revolutionary war. He and his wife both died in this county, and are buried in the cemetery near the old stone church, which is now used as the Grange Hall. John HOFFMAN, grandfather of Jesse, was either born in Columbia County or moved here when very young with his parents. He went from this county to the war of 1812. He had about 170 acres of land, most of which he cleared. He followed farming until about twenty years before his death, and after that lived a retired life. He resided in the county until his death, which occurred about 1849, when about seventy-five years of age, having been preceded by his wife, who died about 1840. (His second wife was Elizabeth STYER). They are buried in the cemetery at Berwick, this county. William HOFFMAN, father of Jesse, was the second in order of age of his parents' family of four children. He was reared in this township, and resided with his parents until he was of age. He married Miss Annie DIETRICH, born in this county, but whose parents were from Germany. After his marriage he bought his father-in-law's farm, carried it on six years, and then moved back to the old homestead of his father. He followed agriculture until his death. They were the parents of six children, of whom three are living: Jesse; John, proprietor of mills at Light Street, and Sarah, wife of Mordecai MILLARD, in Centre Township, this county. Charles, William and Elizabeth are deceased. William HOFFMAN died July 4, 1858, and is buried in the same cemetery as his parents. His widow is now living with her daughter, Sarah, at the age of eighty-six years. Jesse HOFFMAN, subject of this sketch, was reared in Centre Township, this county, and made his home with his parents until twenty-six years of age. His father was then proprietor of what is now Wolverton's mills, and when Jesse was a boy he uses to help his father in the mill. He was engaged there altogether four or five years. On November 10, 1857, he was married to Miss Frances L. MILLARD, a native of this county, and daughter of Reese and Elizabeth MILLARD, both now deceased and buried at Berwick, this county. Mr. and Mrs. Jesse HOFFMAN are parents of five children: Charles (deceased in infancy); Cora (deceased when three years old); William, married to Sarah J. MILLER, is an engineer at Creveling's Quarry, and was educated at the State normal, Bloomsburg, Penn., Reese and Ray attended the State normal school, Bloomsburg, Penn. Mr. and Mrs. HOFFMAN are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. HOFFMAN has 164 acres of land, well improved. Six generations of the HOFFMAN family may now be counted as having inhabited Columbia County in the various epochs of its history, and all six have been entirely identified with Centre Township. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 420)

GEORGE H. HENKELMANN, farmer, P. O. Lime Ridge, was born at Dornburg, Hesse-Cassel, Germany, June 17, 1833, son of Henry and Elizabeth (CARL) HENKELMANN, the former of whom served for thirty-three years as a soldier, being in all the campaign against the first Napoleon. When not in the army he followed the business of miner, and also did something at weaving. Mrs. Elizabeth HENKLEMANN died June 17, 1833. Our subject lived with his father the remainder of his stay in the old country, learning the trade of butcher, and when he had reached the age of eighteen years, he and some friends decided to go to America to try their fortunes. Accordingly, taking a farewell leave of his friends and relatives at his native town, he went to Bremen, where he took passage on a sailing vessel bound for Baltimore, and after a somewhat stormy voyage of forty-one days, in which the ship collided with another one, they arrived at that city June 15, 1852. He started the next day for Philadelphia, and from there came to Hazleton, Luzerne County, where he engaged in the mines, and was thus employed about seven months. He then secured employment in the chemical works of DORNNEMANN & MATENER, the senior member of which firm was a relative of Mr. HENKELMANN. In their employment he remained about one year and a half, and then went to work in the mines again, in which he was employed for several years; then went to Tamaqua, Schuykill [sic] Co, Penn., and was employed in the mines there for several months; and then recommenced his trade of butcher in the shop of Thomas BROD. He worked for him about six or eight months, and in the latter part of March, 1856, he went to Buffalo, N. Y., and became employed as a freight handler for the Western Transportation Company, loading and unloading canal boats. He remained in the employ of this company during October, 1856; then went to Stockton, Luzerne County, where he worked at the butcher trade for William DRESAAT, and afterward for the coal company, Packer, Carder & Lindemann. From there he returned to Tamaqua, and after working a short time in the mines, engaged again in butchering. He remained there three years in the latter business, and then moved to Hazleton, where he engaged in the butcher business for himself, continuing about four years, and then went to Jeddo, Luzerne County, and opened a butcher shop, which he conducted sixteen years; then, October 14, 1882, located on the farm where he now resides, which he had bought in 1874, and where he has nearly seventy-two acres of land. He was married in Tamaqua, Schuykill [sic] Co., Penn., October 4, 1857, to Miss Anne Elizabeth STEIN, a native of Saxony, Germany, and daughter of Michael STEIN. When Mrs. HENKELMANN was young her mother died, and her father died in 1883, near Wilkesbarre, Penn. Mr. and Mrs. HENKELMANN were the parents of nine children, of whom seven are living: Anna S., wife of Adam FERNAN (they live at Drifton, Luzerne Co., Penn.); George, married to Miss Heneretta VENDAMARD (they live in Wanamie, Luzerne Co., Penn.); Alice, married to George WEIGAND, January 25, 1887, and residing at Jeddo, Luzerne County; Matilda, Heneretta, Augusta and Clara. Cassie and Lizzie both died in March, 1886, twelve days apart. Mr. and Mrs. HENKELMANN are attendants of the Lutheran and German Reformed Churches, Briarcreek Township. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., Lodge No. 65, at Hazleton, and of German Lodge, No. 79, at Hazleton. He has passed all the chairs in the latter. Politically he is a Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 421)

HENRY HESS, retired farmer, P. O. Lime Ridge, was born near Easton, Penn., December 12, 1808, son of Frederick and Catherine (FLEURY) HESS. The grandparents of our subject came to this country from Germany, and located near Easton, where they lived all their days. Frederick HESS, father of Henry, was born and reared near Easton, Penn., and there learned the mason's trade, which he followed altogether until coming to what is now Columbia County, about 1812; he located just above where the canal lock is situated at Lime Ridge. He bought fifty acres of this land, then mostly covered with timber, and set about clearing up a portion of it. He was married twice before coming too this county, and after the death of his first wife he married Elizabeth FLEURY, by whom he had four children, three now living: Henry; Susan, widow of Samuel HAGENBUCH, and Rebecca, widow of David COLEMAN. Elizabeth, wife of Charles HAGENBUCH, is deceased. After coming up here Frederick HESS ran the Stonytown ferry, followed his trade of mason and had his land cultivated. He died in 1820, and is buried at the Brick Church, Briarcreek Township, this county. His widow, Elizabeth, survived him a number of years, dying about 1847. She is buried in Hidlay Cemetery. Henry HESS, subject of this sketch, was but a child when his parents moved from the neighborhood of Easton to what is now this county, and his father having died when he (Henry) was but twelve years of age, he was taken by his second cousin, John HESS, of Wapwallopen, Luzerne Co., Penn., and with him our subject worked on the farm until he was in his nineteenth year. He then came to what is now Centre Township, this county, and commenced to learn the wagon-making trade with Michael HAGENBUCH, who had a shop on land now belonging to Joseph HESS, son of Henry, and adjoining Henry's land. Here he remained about three years, and after he had learned the trade he went down to Lime Ridge, and commenced tending lock on the canal there. He was in charge of that lock for ten years, and also worked at times at his trade, and farmed a little. After he had been there he was married March 25, 1832, to Miss Maria HAYMAN, a native of Berks County, Penn., and daughter of Peter and Sevilla HAYMAN, who removed from Berks County to this county when Mrs. HESS was about three years of age. They located about two miles from Orangeville on Fishing creek, and there lived the rest of their days, both dying in 1827, within four weeks of each other. They are buried in Hidlay Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. HESS, after their marriage, lived at Lime Ridge, and then they moved onto the farm in the neighborhood of where they now reside, and which farm Mr. HESS had previously purchased. He bought his present residence and lot in 1871, and since that they have lived retired from active labor. Mr. and Mrs. HESS were the parents of nine children, two of whom died in infancy. Those living are Sevilla, wife of Daniel MOURER, lives at Afton, this county; Levina, wife of Wesley HESS, lives in this township; Joseph A., married to Levina COLEMAN, also lives in Centre Township; William Henry, married to Sevilla HAYMAN, lives on the farm of his parents; Isaiah Jacob, married to Alice HESS, lives at Lime Ridge, this county; Emma Jane, wife of Lloyd CONNER, live at Hazleton, Penn.; James Harvey, clerking at Berwick, this county. Mr. HESS is a member of the German Reformed Church, in which he has been deacon and elder, and Mrs. HESS of the Lutheran denomination. He has held the office of road supervisor in times past. Mr. HESS owns about ninety acres of land, and has yet in his possession the old deed of his farm, which shows the survey of the land to have been made in 1769. This deed is written in a good hand on sheepskin, and makes a very large document. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 422)

ISAAC LOW, was born in Lycoming County, Penn., April 6, 1802, a son of John LOW, who was a blanket weaver and carried on the manufacture of fancy bed spreads in Lycoming County on the Muncy Hills. He died in 1813, Isaac being but eleven years of age at the time. Isaac then went to live with his brother, Thomas, by whom he was reared to the age of eighteen years. He then went to work on a farm for Jesse BOWMAN, in Columbia County, and was thus engaged for two years. He and Mr. BOWMAN, then bought a team and carried goods from New York and Philadelphia to supply the stores of this section, there being then no other freighting facilities, canals and railroads being then in the future. He was thus engaged for two or three years and then he and Mr. BOWMAN bought the farm of Abram MILLER's heirs, in what is now Briarcreek Township, this county, and known as the old Clover mill property; the other farm was locaated at Lime Ridge, now Centre Township. This property consists of 300 acres, which lie in the shape of an L around the point and rear of Lime Ridge. He then went to farming the Clover mill tract in Briarcreek Township, which was farmed about four years. John and Jesse BOWMAN had previously been holding the BOWMAN interests in common and at this period, wishing to make a change in their relations, offered Mr. LOW his choice of the Briarcreek or Lime Ridge tracts, and he chose the latter; he then moved on it and went farming. He found the only improvements on the place to be log buildings of early construction, but afterward erected substantial improvements, which still remain. On this place he farmed until two years before his death, when he bought his residence property in Lime Ridge and there lived until his death. He married, in this county, in 1823, Miss Maria MILLER, a native of this county and daughter of Abraham MILLER, Her parents came from Chester County, Penn., to this county and lived in Briarcreek Township until their death. They are buried in Bloomsburg. Mr. and Mrs. Isaac LOW were the parents of ten children, of whom three are now living: E. W. M., the subject of the following sketch: C. W., who resides at Orangeville, this county, and Frances, wife of H. C. BARTON of Lime Ridge. The deceased are Thomas, Abraham, George L., Thomas B., Maria Emily, S. Alice and Elizabeth M. Isaac LOW died May 27, 1847; his widow survived him until 1856. The latter was born May 10, 1802, and both are buried in Lime Ridge Cemetery. Dr. E. W. M. LOW was the third in order of age of the family of ten children and is the eldest of the three now living, and made his home with his parents until the time of their death. He attended the schools of his neighborhood when a boy and then went to Williamsport, this county, where he attended the seminary for two years. He was engaged is the boating business during 1853-54-55. He then entered on the study of medicine with Dr. F. C. HARRISON at Bloomsburg, Penn., and commenced attendance in the winter of 1855 at Castleton, Vt., and there took his first course. He then entered Pennsylvania Medical College at Philadelphia and graduated from that institution in March, 1857. He engaged at his profession, however, but little, as he devoted himself to the mercantile and limestone interests on the first of the following June, at Lime Ridge in company with C. W. & G. L. LOW, under the firm name of LOW Brothers; a few years later the firm changed to E. W. M. & G. L. LOW, and this firm continued without any change until about 1870, when the style became LOW Bros. & Co. Both firms are, however, doing business to-day. G. L. LOW died in 1877 and on his death his son, Myron I., and his daughter have taken his interest. E. W. M. LOW was married in this county, in 1860, to Miss Rebecca J. HILL, a native of this county and a daughter of Jacob and Anna HILL, the former of whom is deceased and is buried in the family graveyard on the farm near Lime Ridge. His widow resides with her children. Mr. and Mrs. LOW are the parents of nine children, of whom eight are living: Elmer E., Helen May, Elizabeth A., Mary Rebecca, George L., Alice L., Thomas H. and John Vincent. Banks is deceased. Mr. LOW is a Republican in politics. He was a member of the I. O. O. F. but withdrew, and is now a member of the A. F. & A. M. and A. A. & S. R. at Bloomsburg, in which he has had a number of offices. He is one of the directors of the First National Bank of Bloomsburg and general manager of the firms of E. W. M. & G. L. LOW and Low Bros. & Co. Mr. and Mrs. LOW are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 423)

GEORGE L. LOW, late of Lime Ridge, Penn., the fifth child and son of Isaac and Maria (MILLER) LOW, and member of the firm of E. W. M. & G. L. LOW and LOW, Bros. & Co., was born February 25, 1834. The first eleven years of his life were passed with his parents on the farm, and, during the winter months, in the public school. The days of his youth were spent within a quarter of a mile of the old home. As manhood approached he went to Williamsport Seminary to complete his education. Returning home, teaching engaged his attention. He did credit to the profession, in not only inculcating "first principles," but in illustrating practically "birch" appliances, as even now some of his older pupils feelingly assert. Since teaching in the country was too periodical and the remuneration too small, some more permanent and lucrative employment must be found, and merchandising was decided upon. A partnership, under the firm of C. W. & G. L. LOW, was created and subsequently a portion of the quarry now owned by LOW, Bro. & Co. was purchased. The financial panic of 1857 came, and with it financial embarrassments to this firm, which were overcome soon after E. W. M. LOW, M. D., became the third member, he changing his plans, which led him into a business life instead of a professional one. Later the firm of E. W. M. & G. L. LOW was merged into LOW, Bro. & Co., although both firms exist to-day. George Lane LOW was married January 15, 1857, by Rev. Thomas BARNHART to Mary, daughter of Jacob and Rebecca (WEBB) GARRISON. The marriage was a happy one, as the domestic felicities of after years attest. In 1862 Mr. LOW, in answer to the second emergency call, went out as a volunteer in the service for a short time in defense of the union. He was commissioned second lieutenant of Company H, Thirty-fifth Regiment under Andrew G. CURTIN, July 7, 1863; served as postmaster from 1864 until the time of his death, which occurred February 6, 1877. Mr. LOW possessed remarkable business ability, sound judgment, unquestionable integrity and other personal qualities which not only won for him a fair name, but made many lasting friendships. His last illness was long, weary and trying--a great sufferer, afflicted, yet not a murmur of impatience fell from his lips. He accepted the inevitable with a gentle resignation, realizing that the hand afflicted, comforted. His death in the prime of manhood is universally deplored. To his memory is a granite monument erected in Lime Ridge Cemetery. The following we quote from a press obituary: "Take him all in all, George Lane LOW was a model man. Quiet, modest and always moral, he only needed to be known to be appreciated. So unassuming was he, and so correct in his conversation and life, that many believed him, long before he made a profession, to be a religious man. Before his death, when told he 'had only a few hours to live' said: "I have been expecting this; I am ready.: Mrs. Mary (GARRISON) LOW died June 19, 1881, and is buried by the side of her husband. One son and one daughter survive, Myron I. and Annie B., who hold their father's interest in the two named firms, the business in relation to this interest being done by the former. Both were educated at the State normal school, Bloomsburg. Myron I. LOW was born at Lime Ridge, March 11, 1858, and received his education first at the Lime Ridge schools and finally at the Bloomsburg Normal School, where he graduated in 1876. In church affiliation he is a Methodist, in which body he is a zealous Sunday-school worker; in education he is an ardent Chautauquan; in politics a consistent Republican. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 423)

MORDECAI MILLARD, farmer, P. O. Willow Spring, was born in Centre Township, this county, in the house he now lives in, April 7, 1831, son of Reese and Elizabeth MILLARD. Joseph MILLARD, his grandfather, was one of the old settlers, moving into the county some time before 1800. He bought a tract of land consisting of something over 500 acres. Joseph MILLARD was a Quaker and was regular in his attendance at meeting twice a week. He moved into this county from Berks County, Penn., settling upon land along the river now occupied by John C. CRYDER, and within sight of where Mordecai now lives. Here he lived and died. Reese MILLARD, father of Mordecai, was born and reared in this county. He was twice married, first to Catherine RITTENHOUSE, and they were the parents of six children, four living; William, in Illinois; Joseph B., in Kalamazoo, Mich.; Rebecca, wife of Col. James TUBBS, in Shickshinny, Penn.; Catherine, widow of Isaiah CONNER, in Orangeville, this county. The mother of this family died in about 1818, and is buried at Berwick, this county; and Mr. MILLARD afterward married Elizabeth HORTON, by whom he had four children; Mary B., deceased wife of D. K. SLOAN, of Orangeville, this county; Frances L., married to Jesse HOFFMAN, residing in this township; Mordecai; and Reese, who married Jane FOWLER, now residing in Morris County, Kas. (He was captain in the One Hundred and Twelfth Artillery.) Reese MILLARD, father of the above, died in 1833, and his widow survived him until 1852. Mordecai MILLARD, subject of this sketch, in 1867 received the nomination of the Democratic party for the office of sheriff of Columbia County, and removed to Bloomsburg, to reside there during his term of office. After serving his term as sheriff he was appointed steward of the State Normal University at Bloomsburg, and served in that capacity one year. The office was then vacated for the time being. He received the appointment of doorkeeper of the State Senate for the session of 1871-72, and served in that position throughout that session. He resided in Bloomsburg until 1875, when he returned to his farm and has since conducted it. He was married in this county December 1, 1852, to Miss Sarah J. HOFFMAN, a native of this county, and daughter of William and Annie (DIETRICH) HOFFMAN. Mr. and Mrs. MILLARD are the parents of nine children, of whom four are living; William H., Annie E., Mary I. and Ernest S.; the deceased are John L., Reese M., Fannie H., Charles B. and Hattie L. The family are members of the Methodist Church. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 424)

ELISHA RINGROSE, farmer, P. O. Fowlersville, was born at Schuylerville, Luzerne Co., Penn., September 13, 1845, son of Aaron and Catherine (FOWLER) RINGROSE. The father of our subject was born in Wellingboro, England, and there was reared and learned the butcher trade, an occupation he followed there until coming to Cmerica. On arriving in the United States he located in Luzerne County, Penn., followed droving and butchering, and there lived until he died, following those lines of business. He was married in Luzerne County to Miss Catherine FOWLER. She was a member of an early settler's family. Mr. and Mrs. Aaron RINGROSE were the parents of eight children, of whom seven are living: Delias, wife of William STERNER, of Bloomsburg, this county; Mary; William, also a resident of Bloomsburg; Sarah, wife of William STACK, of Berwick, Penn.; Ellis, in this township; Elisha; J. W., in Mechanicsburg, Cumberland Co., Penn.; Henry died in Briarcreek Township, this county. The father of this family died in about 1855. He is buried at Berwick. His widow now resides at Bloomsburg. Elisha RINGROSE, subject of this sketch, went to live with Mr. and Mrs. Ashel FOWLER, of Briarcreek Township, when he was but five years of age, and was by them reared to manhood, following farming. He then engaged in boating on the canal from Wilkesbarre to Baltimore for about four years, when he bought a boat and embarked in the canal carrying trade for his own account between the points mentioned. He continued in this for three years, and then boated two years more for Weaver & McKelvy, of Bloomsburg, Penn. He then went to Bloomsburg and commenced the blacksmith trade, but after six months he engaged in carpenter work for John STERNER, helping in the construction of the "Exchange Hotel" at Bloomsburg. He was employed at this trade about eighteen months, and then ran the engine of the planing-mill company for about eighteen months; then removed to this township and commenced farming, erecting his present residence in the fall of 1876, into which he moved in the following year. He was married in this county February 22, 1872, to Miss Mary HUTTEN,[sic] a native of this county, and daughter of John and Catherine (KANE) HUTTON, [sic] the former of whom is deceased; the latter is a resident of Centre Township. Miss RINGROSE is a member of the Methodist Church. Mr. RINGROSE is now overseer of the poor of Centre Township. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 424)

GEORGE RUCKLE, farmer, P. O. Orangeville, was born in what is now Centre Township, this county, March 29, 1839, son of Joseph and Margaret (WHITMIRE) RUCKLE. Jacob RUCKLE, grandfather of our subject, came from Berks County, Penn., to this county in its early days, and located on the place now owned by Jacob KELLER, where he had bought land, and there lived until his death. He and his wife both died at this place. Joseph RUCKLE, father of George, was born and reared at the place where his father located when he came to this county. He was brought up to farm life, and made his home with his parents until his marriage, when he bought 110 acres of land in what is now Centre Township, where George now resides, at $3.50 an acre. He found this land covered with a heavy growth of timber, and he set about clearing it up and building a cabin. Here he lived, gradually clearing off his land, until he had a good farm. He was married in this county to Miss Margaret WHITMIRE, a native of this county, and daughter of David WHITMIRE. Her parents came to this county from one of the lower counties; the father died in Snyder County, Penn., and the mother in this county. Before he removed to Snyder County Mr. WHITMIRE had owned three farms here, but he sold them to his sons, and moved down there. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph RUCKLE were the parents of seven children, of whom six are living; Wesley, living in this county; Joseph, living in Bloomsburg; George; David, living in Danville, this county; Elizabeth, living in Light Street, this county; Hester, wife of Conrad HIPPENSHET, living in Scott Township, this county; Sarah, wife of Charles ASH, died February 1, 1886. The father of these children died about 1874, the mother in 1855. They are buried in Hidlay Cemetery. George RUCKLE, subject of this sketch, was reared in what is now Centre Township, this county, until he had reached the age of eighteen years, when he went to Espy to learn the miller's trade with his brother Wesley, who was then operating the mill. Here he remained about fourteen years, and then he and Charles ASH purchased a mill on Briar Creek. They bought in March and the mill burned down in December. They at once rebuilt it, and Mr. RUCKLE retained his interest for eight years, when he went to Espy and remained there one year engaged in the grocery business; then removed to the place he now owns and resides on, which he had bought five years before. He was married in this county, December 30, 1875, to Miss Alvaretta KLINE, a native of Orange Township, this county, and daughter of Hiram and Emily KLINE, the former of whom is deceased; he is buried at Orangeville, at which place his widow, now the wife of Jacob SNYDER, resides. Mr. and Mrs. RUCKLE are the parents of five children: Stanley, Maud, Clifton, George and Elsie. Mr. RUCKLE is a member of the Reformed Church, Mrs. RUCKLE of the Presbyterian Church. He is a Republican politically, and was elected justice of the peace for five years in Briarcreek, this county, but left the township before he had completed his term. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 425)

HENRY SHAFFER, retired farmer, P. O. Fowlersville, was born in what is now Centre Township, this county, December 8, 1818, son of John and Susan (DIETRICH) SHAFFER. Henry SHAFFER, the grandfather of our subject, came to this county in its early days from Berks County, Penn., and located in Briarcreek Township on land now owned by Alfred STEINER. He bought two pieces of land, one of which contains about 160 and the other 25 acres, all covered with a heavy growth of timber; brought his family with him and set about clearing up a space sufficient to put up what buildings it was necessary to have. The log house which he erected contained a living room and a kitchen, and he also put up a log barn. At that time of course there were not many conveniences, and although there was plenty of meat to be obtained, they often had to stint themselves in other necessaries of life, and sometimes had to cook their wheat bran for bread. He afterward put up a frame house, which is now occupied by Alfred STEINER. He died about 1843. His first wife, whom he married in Berks County, had preceded him in death by a number of years; his second wife survived him. He is buried at the Brick Church, of the Lutheran denomination, in Briarcreek Township. John SHAFFER, father of the subject of this sketch, was born at the old homestead, in Briarcreek Township. He made his home with his father until he was married (although he worked out part of the time), and some time after that event he bought a tract of land adjoining where his son, Henry, now lives. From there he removed to where Henry resides, and here he lived and died. He had learned the carpenter trade with a man named Daniel MERKLE, and this he followed, together with farming, until about two years before his death. He had been married in this country to Susan DIETRICH, and they were the parents of seven children, of whom four are living: Henry; Angeline, wife of Levi GANETT (they live in Briarcreek Township); Susan, widow of Stephen CRAWFORD (lives in this county), and Julia, wife of Jacob SLAGER (they live in Binghamton, N. Y.) The deceased are Phoebe; Elizabeth, wife of Peter WENNER, and Emily, wife of Mahlon HICKS. The father of this family died May 9, 1863; the mother died September 12, 1861. They are buried at the Brick Church, in Briarcreek Township. Henry SHAFFER, subject of this sketch, was born in the house where he now resides, and which was built by his grandfather, Jacob DIETRICH. He was reared to farm life and has lived in this house and on this place where his father located when he first came to Centre Township, all his lifetime. He was married in this county, December 31, 1861, to Miss Mary Ann CREASY, a native of Mifflin Township, this county, and daughter of Samuel and Catherine (NUNGESSER) CREASY. Her father died in the spring of 1860, her mother about 1848. They are both buried in the CREASY family graveyard. Mr. and Mrs. SHAFFER are the parents of two children, one of whom died in infancy. Their living child is named Sarah Alice. Mr. and Mrs. SHAFFER are members of the Lutheran Church. MR. SHAFFER has been connected with the schools of the township as director, and has been supervisor of the township. He is a democrat politically; is a member of the Briarcreek Grange P. of H., and has held the office of steward in Centre Grange. He is the owner of 80 acres on his home tract and 160 on another farm also in Centre Township. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 425)

WILLIAM SHAFFER, farmer, P. O. Lime Ridge, was born in Briarcreek Township, this county, December 30, 1821, a son of Francis and Nancy (HETLER) SHAFFER. The SHAFFER family is originally of German descent. Francis SHAFFER was born in the vicinity of Bethlehem, Penn., where he was reared, but came to this county when a young man, and bought something over 300 acres of land in Briarcreek Township. He found this land covered with a heavy growth of timber, while wild game abounded. He commenced by clearing up enough space on which to erect his buildings, and when he had got enough land cleared for that purpose, he used the timber so cut down in the construction of his log cabin, etc. There he lived until his death. He was married in this county to Miss Nancy HETLER, a native of the county, born on the Mifflin Hills, and whose parents were early settlers. Mr. and Mrs. SHAFFER were the parents of five children, of whom four are living: William; Nathan, living in Jones County, Iowa; Catherine, wife of Samuel DALIUS, living in Maine township, this county; George Washington, living in Greene County, Iowa. Mary married Benjamin MILLER, and both are deceased. The mother of these children died about 1831, and was buried in the Brick Church graveyard, in Briarcreek Township, this county. Francis SHAFFER died in October, 1833, and is also buried in the Brick Church graveyard. By the early death of his parents, although he was the eldest of their children, William was left an orphan before he was eleven years of age, and he was reared by Philip FREAS, for whom he worked for his food and clothes until he was sixteen years of age. He then worked for Mr. FREAS by the month, and after one year he worked for Andrew FREAS by the year for two years. He and Andrew FREAS and William HOFFMAN then bought a canal boat, and James K. Polk then being in the zenith of his popularity, they gave it his name. They followed boating in the coal trade from Pittston to Columbia for one season, and then sold out the boat. Mr. SHAFFER, taking sick the same fall, was unable to do anything the following winter. In the next spring he commenced farming on the old place of his father, and taking the farm at the appraisement he worked it a year and a half and then sold it. He then removed to Briarcreek, near BOWMAN's mill, farmed for Thomas BOWMAN, and hauled flour into the coal region for about eighteen months; then rented the Briarcreek grocery, where he carried on mercantile business for four years; then removed to the RITTENHOUSE mill, and was engaged in operating that mill and hauling flour, etc., to Hazleton, Beaver Meadows, and other places in the coal regions. He was here altogether four years, and then removed to another place, and was engaged for one year in huckstering to Hazleton. He then bought the farm where he now resides, and moved to it the following spring. This was in 1856. Mr. SHAFFER was married in Luzerne County, Penn., May 7, 1844, to Miss Sophia MOWERY, a native of Mifflin Township, this county, and daughter of John and Catherine (HETLER) MOWERY, the former of whom was born near Mauch Chunk, Penn., and the latter in Mifflin Township, this county. The father died in 1824, his widow surviving him until about 1871. They are both buried at Mifflinville, this county. Mr. and Mrs. SHAFFER were the parents of seven children, of whom four are living: Winfield Scott, married to Miss Flora MOSTELLER (they live in Briarcreek Township, this county); Wesley, married to Miss Rachael FREAS (they live in this county); and William Madison, who lives with his parents. Fannie Dorcas, Sarah Jane and Mary Minerva are deceased. Mr. SHAFFER has 237 acres, being one of the large land holders of Centre Township. Mr. and Mrs. SHAFFER are members of the Lutheran Church. He has held the office of county commissioner for three years, having been elected about 1871. He is a member of Centre Grange, No. 56, P. of H. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 426)

A. W. SPEAR, farmer, P. O. Light Street, was born in Wayne County, N. Y., November 4, 1848, son of Rev. N. and Diantha (WELLS) SPEAR. The former was born in Ware, Mass., and was there reared until he was a young man. His parents died when he was young, and he went to Wayne County, N. Y., where he followed tailoring and kept a store and postoffice. He removed from there to Wayne County, Penn., and there became connected with the American Tract Society and the American Bible Society, in the interests of which he traveled a number of years. He then acquired a taste for the ministry and educated himself for it with these societies. From Wayne County he removed to Scranton, Penn., and after severing his connection with these causes, he removed to Orangeville, this county, where he became pastor of the Presbyterian Church. He preached at Orangeville, at Raven Creek Church, in Benton Township, at Rohrsburg and afterward at New Columbia, Hemlock Township. He also preached at Light Street. This and Hidlay Church in Centre Township were his last charges. He retired from the ministry in 1882, and then bought property in Bloomsburg, where he has since resided. He is now the county agent of the American Bible Society. He has a farm of seventy-six acres in Centre Township. A. W. was ten years old when his family removed to Scranton and two years later moved to Orangeville, and lived with his parents, except seven years in Berwick and Wilkesbarre, Penn., working at the machinist's trade until he was married, when he located on his father's farm, where he now resides. He was married at New Columbia Church, this county, December 24, 1878, to Miss Anna M., a native of Montour County and daughter of Cornelius and Rosanna STEYER. Mr. and Mrs. SPEAR are the parents of two children: Eunice F. and Ruth W. The family are members of the Presbyterian Church, of which he is an elder. He is secretary of the Columbia County Sunday-school Association; is also one of the county auditors, and is an auditor in the Briarcreek Farmers' Mutual Insurance Company. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 426)

John M. WHITE, farmer, P.O. Light Street, was born in Orange Township, this county, December 30, 1833, son of William and Jane (McMURTIE) WHITE. Peter WHITE, grandfather of John M., a farmer, came to this county probably in the latter part of the last century. He located near Orangeville, where he lived until about 1806, when he removed to the vicinity of Light Street. Of his family of ten children, William, father of our subject, was the fourth in order of age, born in what is now Orange Township, this county, in 1803. He lived with his parents until he was married, and then bought a farm about a mile north of Light Street. This farm was partly cleared, and had some improvements on it. There he lived for about twenty-five years; then bought another farm adjoining it, to which he removed and here erected new buildings. There he lived until he died. He was married in this county to Miss Jane McMURTIE, a native of Warren County, N. J., born near Belvidere, a daughter of Abraham McMURTIE, who was a farmer in New Jersey, but toward the latter part of his life kept hotel. Her parents both died in New Jersey. Mr. and Mrs. William White were the parents of twelve children, of whom nine are living: Elizabeth M., wife of J. D. MELICK, a traveling salesman residing at Muncy, Penn.; Mary, wife of George CONNER, residing in Centre Township, this county; John M.; Abram M., in Wood County, Ohio; Isaiah S., in Orange Township, this county; Samantha A., wife of Peter EVANS, living near Rupert, this county; W. PIERCE, in Union County, Penn.; Anna Margaret, widow of Alem VAN LIEW, living in Light Street, this county, and M. Alvaretta, wife of A. P. HOWELL. Sarah Jane, wife of Howard GRIMES, is deceased. The father of this family died February 18, 1879; the mother in 1871. Our subject was reared in this county, and made his home with his parents until he was over twenty-three years of age. After that he cultivated one of his father's four farms for several years, and bought the tract of land on which he now resides in 1868, and three years later moved on to it. When he first purchased it there was a tannery in operation on the place, but he rented that for several years and then sold it. He was married in this county February 10, 1857, to Miss Tacy E. VANDERSLICE, a native of this county, and a daughter of John HIESTER and Catherine (MELICK) VANDERSLICE. Her father was born in Chester County, Penn., and her mother in this county. The MELICKS came to this county from New Jersey. Both parents are deceased and are buried in the Vanderslice graveyard in Hemlock Township, this county. Mr. and Mrs. WHITE are parents of five children: Hiester V. (an attorney at law and senior member of the firm of H.V. WHITE & Co., dealers in grain, flour, feed, coal, etc., at Bloomsburg: he is married to Clara E. AIKMAN), William L., Clara, Hattie and John. William LeRoy WHITE was born in Orange Township, this county, September 18, 1860, second son of John M., and Tacy E. (VANDERSLICE) WHITE. After obtaining a liberal education in the schools of his vicinity and the Orangeville Academy, he commenced teaching in 1879, and in 1880 he went west, spending some time in the States of Michigan, Illinois and Iowa, teaching school and at times working on the farms. On his return he entered into the grain shipping business with his brother, and is still the junior member of the firm of H. V. WHITE & Co. He resides in Bloomsburg, Penn., where he has general supervision of their business. The parents are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. WHITE is a Democrat politically and has held local offices in the township. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 427)

PAUL ZANER, retired farmer, P. O. Fowlersville, was born in what was in now Centre Township, this county, June 7, 1815, son of Daniel and Hannah (ADAMS) ZANER. The grandfather of Paul, on his father's side, came from Germany, and located in what was then a wilderness in the neighborhood of the present town of Tamaqua, Schuylkill Co., Penn., but then in Northampton. This country was then very wild, and bears, wolves, panthers, deer, etc., were about the only other living occupants of the surrounding forests. Fish of all kinds were abundant in the streams, and Mr. ZANER spent a great deal of his time hunting and fishing. He and his wife died and are buried in that vicinity. They were the parents of ten children--eight boys and two girls. Of these, four came to this county: Adam, Abraham, and George came to what is now Columbia County in about 1800, and Abraham put up a distillery in Briarcreek Township. He carried on this business a few years only, but lived here until his death in 1833. He is buried at the Brick Church, Briarcreek Township. George is buried in the turnpike cemetery in Briarcreek Township. Adam moved out to Ohio. About eight or ten years after these three came out, their brother Daniel came and lived with his brothers a couple of years, then married and bought land, which J. L. WOLVERTON now owns and lives on. He had learned the milling trade in the mill of his brother in Schuylkill County, and when he located at the place mentioned here, he put up a grist-mill, the first one on the site of what is known as "Wolverton mill." That mill was put up in 1816, and he operated it, carrying on farming to some extent until 1851, when he sold the property and moved to where David Z. REMANLEY now lives, and there spent the remainder of his days. He was married in this county to Miss Hannah ADAMS, a daughter of Anthony ADAMS. Mr. and Mrs. Daniel ZANER were the parents of six children, of whom five are living: Paul; John, living in Fishingcreek, this county; Julia Ann, wife of John ECKROTH, Light Street, this county; Mary M., wife of Daniel W. MILLER, living in Audubon County, Iowa; Levi, also in Audubon County, Iowa. Catherine, wife of Charles WERKHEISER, of Mifflinville, this county, is deceased. The father of this family died January 24, 1856; the mother in September, 1870. They are buried at the Briarcreek Church, in Briarcreek Township. Paul ZANER, subject of this sketch, was born and reared in the house where J. L. WOLVERTON now resides, in this township. He made his home with his parents until he reached the age of twenty-one years; and up to that time had assisted his father in the mill. But this work not being beneficial to his health he, on arriving at age, went to learn the trade of mill-wrighting with Chamber DAVIS, of Bloomsburg, Penn. Mr. DAVIS went out of the business about eighteen months later, and then Mr. ZANER worked with another man about two months. In 1837 he went to work on the construction of nearly all of the buildings in this vicinity since that time, and in the summer of 1885, at the age of over seventy years, he did nearly all the inside work on the house of Aaron KELCHNER, making the doors and sashes himself. Mr. ZANER is known as a very skilled worker in wood. He bought his present place in 1854. He has twenty-five acres of land in his tract, and nine acres in another lot. He was married in this county January 24, 1841, to Miss Rebecca FREAS, a native of this county, and a daughter of Philip FREAS. Mr. and Mrs. ZANER were the parents of six children, of whom four are living: Charles W., married to Harriet STROW, living in Danville, Montour County; Alverna, wife of Addison ZIMMERMAN, living in this township; Clemuel, at home; Alice, wife of Albert KELCHNER, living in this township. The deceased are Mahala, who died about 1858, and an infant unnamed. Mr. ZANER is a Republican politically. He owns a much prized relic in the shape of a clock, about as old as himself, and which keeps excellent time, which Jacob DIEFENBACH, a Presbyterian minister of Bloomsburg, made for him. (History of Columbia and Montour Counties Pennsylvania, Battle, 1887, Centre Township pg. 428)

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